Starting restore on 71 crestliner

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by TheSauce, Jul 15, 2013.

  1. TheSauce
    Joined: Jul 2013
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    Location: wisconsin

    TheSauce New Member

    Request mod to move to fiberglass section? dont know how that happened. Thanks in advance

    Hey guys! New to the forums and going to open up with a post about my first ever boat restore project. I got a 71 crestliner for free from a friend that had sank to the bottom of the lake due to dry rot in the plugs. Going to be moving slow, but I still wanted to start a thread while I poke around looking for tutorials pertaining to my project.

    We started by gutting out the carpet, wooden floor, waterlogged foam, etc...tried taking the rubrail off but it seems to be pretty well stuck on there, not to mention the top and bottom fiberglass pieces are stapled together? i found that odd... - I tried prying it up and then decided I may want to wait to see how easy it will be to get a replacement.

    Basically the plan is to sand it down to bare glass - try to even out some low spots or maybe re-glass the entire hull(inside or out?) and then paint the entire boat before rebuilding the inside.
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    after we started sanding the top
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    the inside after we sucked out alot of the water
    http://s3.photobucket.com/user/L0ckd0wn2021/media/DSC00454_zps4d569a1c.jpg.html?sort=3&o=6

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    (the side looks like we started sanding, but its just dust - we still only started knocking out the top)
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    http://s3.photobucket.com/user/L0ckd0wn2021/media/DSC00460_zps3ce58330.jpg.html?sort=3&o=0

    some of my major concerns at this stage are:
    1. the hull - there are a few spots where when the sun shines you can see through the fiberglass on the bottom - not like a hole or a crack, just like either the paint is off and so you can see thorugh - or the glass is just thin there.
    2. the wood under the top - all the other wood was rotted so im sure any other wood i find will be/should be replaced
    3. the transom. i havnt futzed with it yet but im sure it will need to be reinforced or something
    4. how to secure the floor down

    thanks for taking the time to look - like I said I'm still searching the forums so if you have any links that you think might help me please send em my way. was just trying to show you guys what im working with.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2013
  2. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    If you are willing to assign high entertainment value to the process of rebuilding this boat.....Then go for it. The work will be messy, itchy, and stinky. You are going to spend a lot more than lunch money on this project. It is very often less expensive to buy a functioning used boat than to rebuild a derelict.

    The transom is likely to have a waterlogged, perhaps rotten, core. You will need to replace it. The stringers in the bottom are likely to have wood or foam cores. You will need to determine whether that is the case and replace them if any sign of rot or soaking is discovered. Grind or saw off some of the glass and see what is under there.

    The transluscent areas in the bottom are not encouraging signs. At the least, there is no gel coat on the outside. At worst, there is little or no glass fiber in those places. Drill a hole through those places to determine thickness of the skin and whether there is sufficient glass fiber there. You will eventually plug the holes and perhaps laminate some glass over the suspect spots. Use epoxy, not polyester, when doing patchwork. Epoxy costs a plenty but it is reliable and polyester is not. Do all the needed work on the inside before you do anything to the outside.

    You have a huge project there. It is do-able if you are determined to see the job through. You can even make a nice looking boat out of it. Nevertheless, I would give it a decent burial in the landfill.

    Sorry to be so pessimistic. Pessimism often accompanies reality. Keep us informed of your progress.
     
  3. TheSauce
    Joined: Jul 2013
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    Location: wisconsin

    TheSauce New Member

    i was wondering if that would be the case inside the stingers - and for the transom i have to remove the cover right?

    the most important question, and one i need to have answered before i really continue in any way that will make good progress - is there replacement rubgaurds? I pulled out the rubber bumper because i know I can replace that, but the metal garud. if i rip that off and it gets screwed up - can i find a replacement thats not going to cost an arm and a leg?

    also - if the stingers are air tight - do i still need to cut to see whats inside? i was hoping i could leave them intact and just build up on the floor - but like i mentioned it was at the bottom of a lake in a shallow section for a little under a week from what i was told...so i guess i answered my own question hah

    i just grind down the top part of the stingers then?


    EDIT:\\
    also what do you mean epoxy vs polyester? i was under the impression that to patch a hole id need to drill it out and muck it up with a resin/fiber mix and then do a few coats over it? sometime this week im having a guy from the local boat shop who does the fiber glassing come take a look at it; so i guess i will know more then
     
  4. 805gregg
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Ojai, Ca

    805gregg Junior Member

    Not worth the money or effort, cut it up and put it in a dumpster
     
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  5. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    Looks like we're in the same boat....pardon the pun. I have just been given the Hartley flareline for free. I take possession tomorrow 17'th/7. There will be many small issues to work through with both these boats & we most likely won't ever get our money back. The labour side out ways the expense I think too. I used to go out on my pop's Hartley when I was a kid so I'm feeling a bit nostalgic, I'm not entering this undertaking with rose coloured glasses on though. Take your time, do your homework & it should be a fun little boat. I wish I was getting a smaller one but I'm looking forward to getting the Hartley on the water next year & taking my step dad fishing. He's mad keen with a rod but he's also a big guy so I'm glad I found a big boat. My advise would be to leave the rub rail alone. You may be able to glass up to the edge and you won't run the risk of the hull & deck separating.
     
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  6. TheSauce
    Joined: Jul 2013
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    Location: wisconsin

    TheSauce New Member

    my concern with the deck is that underneath the fiberglass there is wood - and seeing as how this sat at the bottom of a lake at least for a little bit - my understanding is i should replace all the wood i can find?

    this boat is somewhat sentimental to me as well. its almost identical to the one my grandparents had when i was a youngling - even just setting it up on the trailer when we went to pick it up...it just made me smile.

    i was thinking about starting work on the stringers today - with my minimal knowledge i was thinking of grinding the top off of a small segment of each of them to see how they are holding up in there. im already assuming the wood or foam in there needs to be replaced - so my question is this;
    if complete removal is needed - should i just grind the flat top off of the stringers, replace - and then that way i can just reglass the top? or is it something id have to remove completely(the fiberglass parts of the stringer)?

    EDIT://// also, when it gets to the time when i will be working on the transom / replacing it - how will i get by without removng the deck? i ask because right now, the deck is held on by the aluminum rub rail - and under the rub rail is deck is stapled to the hull about ever 1/2 inch...the only thing i could think of would be to remove the rub rail, pull the staples, pull the deck, and then when it comes time to put it all back together, I have no idea how to go about reattaching. i mean finding a rub rail that will work shouldnt be TOO hard - but at the same time i feel like there will be alot of damage to the fiberglass tabs...i dont know. anyone who knows any tricks to this?
     
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  7. TheSauce
    Joined: Jul 2013
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    Location: wisconsin

    TheSauce New Member

    Bump for help - got a new plug and splashed the hull today. Turns out its leaking from around the pipe insert that the plug goes into. Transom is soaked but strong. Need to know my options with removing the cap - the rub rail is next to impossible to get off without damaging the fiberglass - are there other options?

    Is finding a way to create a seal to get the plug in an option? I know the transom is soaked - and I know its not the proper way - but is it a possibility? If I cant get the cap off I dont know how Im going to replace this transom.


    RE REQUEST MOD TO MOVE THIS TO THE FIBERGLASS BOAT SECTION PLEASE
     
  8. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    The deal with the waterlogged wood in the transom, goes like this......In its condition is it sufficiently strong to absorb the force that the motor will impart? If you have an outboard that is worth several thousand dollars, then it is kind of scary to clamp it onto a questionable transom.

    The stringers can be attacked with a wood bit. Drill into the side through the glass, near the bottom, and take out a plug. Use an awl or ice pick to poke the wood. You will know if it is compromised. If you have to replace the stringers than just grinding off the top is not going to get the bad core out. It'll be stuck in there with the fibergalss resin. You will have to cut them out from each side near the bottom as you can manage. Then you will proceed to grind the fins down to the level bottom. Now you start over with new wood and proceed to encapsulate them with glass fibers and resin. Repairs of this kind can turn into a lot of work. If you do not mind the itchy, sweaty, profanity laced job then it can be considered, only work.

    If you decide to abandon this job, then it is well to know that fiberglass does not make a good or pleasant bonfire.:D
     
  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are lots of previous threads about what you need to do and what you'll find when you start ripping things apart. Avail yourself of these information gold mines.

    You can play around with less destructive methods, but the fastest and easiest way for transoms and stringers is to just cut the tabbing off flush (as practical) to the hull shell and grind the bonding surfaces back to good 'glass. The tabbing can often be reused, once the wooden bits are ground out, though many just make new pieces and tab these down to the hull shell. I've done it both ways and have found the time it takes to clean up the old "hats" and tabbing is as much as just putting in new stuff, so pick your poison.
     
  10. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    A friend of mine found dents in the transom of his boat after upgrading to a bigger outboard. He glued a sheet of alloy to the external side & it did the trick. Not pretty but that's a matter of opinion. I've looked at your boat photo's & the way I see it you have a couple of options, 1. cut & remove the top cap on the outboard well & try to access the transom timbers from above. 2. cut & remove the transom outer fibreglass skin. Both these option's could be riddled with danger though. Easiest way I think would be to just add an alloy or stainless steel sheet to reinforce the transom on the outside. Depends if you want to fully restore the boat to original spec's or just get it safe & on the water.
     
  11. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    Lots of work !! hope you are a dedicated boatie and dont cut corners !!!

    Just looking quickly I would suggest you remove the deck off the hull . will make it much easier to work on the interior and may find the decks not stuck that well anyway , if the transom needs replacing its the perfect opportunity to dig out the old wood and replace with new better wood !!.
    Those cracks in the gel coat are typical of a weak transom anyway and the crazing in the gel coat really has to go down to bare glass or the cracks will just keep showing through as time goes by .
    If you going to add another skin over the outside the gel coat has to go anyway so the new will stuck properly .
    With the deck off all inside work is better to be done before you tackle the outside . With the deck off and no floor inside its easy to get a twist in the hull so be aware of this before you glass in the floor again . the floor and the deck combined hold the hull ridged so check before glassing that the gunnel is level across in about 3 or 4 places and block it in position before starting to glass of fit the floor!!. once its glass it can not be twisted back into shape again and would have to be cut all way round to correct it !!. :p:D
     
  12. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    Keep us updated with photos too please.
     
  13. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    Did I read it right its been sunk for a while in a lake ?
    OOOOH !don't know where you intend to do the work but the boat needs to be dried out ! and be in a totally dry environment like really low humidity for a while . to suck all the moisture possible out of every little nook and cranny . you have a really big job ahead of you and I hope you will set a clear path to follow . the transom should really be beefed up thickness wise as It would never have been built to take the kind of horse power of the modern day motors so that's another serious thought to consider !! like I said It would be a good idea to remove the deck completely ! could do deck rebuild and repairs easier and much easier to do the hull work as well !! the join could possibly come apart quite easily by the look at the gunnel shape .

    Already been said !!!post lots pictures and will get more help than you can wave a stick at I would say !!:p:p
     

  14. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    Location: AU

    djaus Salted Nut!

    Waiting patiently for updated pics Mr Sauce. I think just being out of the lake would go a fair way to drying everything out. Most of the timber in that boat would be sealed anyhow wouldn't it?
     
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