Starting problem

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by davem99, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. davem99
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Hamilton, Canada

    davem99 Junior Member

    I have a 25 ft. sailboat with a Bukh DV8SLME inboard engine with saildrive. The engine has become hard to start in cold weather (say 40F or lower). I have been able to get around this by using a 120V hair dryer (on shore power) to blow hot air into the air intake while cranking the engine. I am reluctant to use starting fluid. A mechanic I rely on has suggested finding a way to heat the air intake off battery power. The Bukh dealer in my area did not reply to an email asking about this. Would appreciate any relevant comments or suggestions.
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Does it have pre-heaters?
     
  3. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    You should be quite familiar with glow plugs (preheaters) living in Canada. Does it not have them?

    If not, how about an engine blanket or block heater?

    I would trust your instincts and not spray starting fluid into the intake.
     
  4. Carteret
    Joined: Jan 2004
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    Location: Eastern NC

    Carteret Senior Member

    A block heater would work wonders. If a starting aid is needed WD 40 is very effective and does not harm a diesel engine.
     
  5. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    The Bukh should be able to start within 2 revs even in cold weather provided that
    a. the battery has sufficient cranking capacity
    b. the compression ratio is within specs
    c. the fuel has the proper viscosity (winter quality).

    Manual starting below 40F requires a lot of force, even with a brand new engine.
    If your tank contains fuel from last summer, you can add up to 10% gasoline.
     
  6. pistnbroke
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Noosa.Australia where god kissed the earth.

    pistnbroke I try

    There was a device called a thermostart that went in the inlet and burnt diesel ....would not a small propane torch produce hot air when required away from mains power....photo under google but it wont load onto the site
     
  7. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Starting fluid is NOT a danger when it is used ONLY as a cold starting aid.

    An engine your size will only need 3 or 4cc.

    Run a warm engine on ether to attempt to prime it and you are in big trouble.

    Near zero F most early engines will need a touch of spray or a water jacket block heater.

    A simple cold starting technique is to crank for 20-30 seconds , then wait 45 seconds and do it again.

    Usually the third or 4th time the engine will fire , with huge white smoke from the unburned fuel.

    The stop (no fuel) cable can be used for the first two cylinder warming crankings.

    FF
     
  8. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    That was my 1th thought also, but I checked the Danish parts drawings and saw they don't offer such a system on these engines.
    This is an engine in lawnmower style with only basic equipment, much like my single cylinder Chinese generator that never has a starting problem except with an empty tank.
     
  9. pistnbroke
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Noosa.Australia where god kissed the earth.

    pistnbroke I try

    I am sure one would self tap into a suitable hole in the inlet manifold or extension though I understand they are not reliable long term ....propane torch thats the simple answer ..piezo igniton ..easy .. Have seen cylinder heads drilled for heater plugs in the pre conbustion chamber .......
     
  10. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    So, these engines donĀ“t have glowplugs?
     
  11. davem99
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Hamilton, Canada

    davem99 Junior Member

    No, but I'm looking into fitting a glowplug or a block heater. Thanks.
    Davem99
     
  12. Carteret
    Joined: Jan 2004
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    Location: Eastern NC

    Carteret Senior Member

    My preference is the block heater. You can even install a timer if you choose not to heat the engine 24/7.
     
  13. davem99
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Hamilton, Canada

    davem99 Junior Member

    Thanks. I am pursuing this.
     
  14. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    I think block heater(s) and glow plugs would be the way to go here for a diesel in Hamilton. You'd want to use the glow plugs first and then, as the temperature drops, combine them with increasing durations of pre-heating with the block heater(s). You'll save on engine wear, starter wear and even battery wear.

    -Tom
     

  15. davem99
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Hamilton, Canada

    davem99 Junior Member

    Noted - thanks Tom.
    DM
     
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