Stand-Up Rowing Catamaran

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by John Larkin, Nov 3, 2020.

  1. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

  2. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I want a Stand Up Rower (SUR) but with oars that Stay In Water (SIW) sorta like rear sculling single or used on transome, but off to the sides, and the oar blades would function more like Hobie flippers. The Body Motion would be down near ankles to full overhead reach (or anything in between). In theory, this would, like Hobie or aft sculling oar, not waste energy with any recovery stroke. I guess it would need an way to keep the oar's pivot on the transom during the (rower's) Lifting stroke. I'm thinking the oars would be manually canted 15-25deg (total 30-50deg), and the oars would be similar to the long oars on the left, except maybe longer, and would have their tailing edge sharpened and blade given an "aerobatic" airfoil. Strokes up and down wouldn't be of equal speed and I'm guessing the rower's down stroke would be more POWERFUL but not necessarily the FASTEST, thus the oar's foil not likely to be exactly symmetrical. Oars cold be used more conventionally, with diff oarlocks or rower position.
     

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  3. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Look into Venetian gondolas.
    I believe the use a sculling motion and are not lifted out of the water.
     
  4. clmanges
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    clmanges Senior Member

    Yuloh.
     
  5. alan craig
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    alan craig Senior Member

    I found this for you! (the first minute or so)

    In the Venetian boat that I saw being rowed, the oars were much longer than these and crossed over so that the left hand held the right oar and vice versa.
     
  6. BlueBell
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    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    And you can see in the video how this design lends itself to varying the hull shape in the water by varying the loading.
    I.e. his weight is "aft" thereby changing the water plane while enjoying two way directionality.
     
  7. clmanges
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    clmanges Senior Member

    I wouldn't want to do that stand-up stroke, it looks brutal. Complicated, too; he has to feather the oars while they're still in the water. But FWIW, I bet he could do push-ups all day.
     
  8. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Change the geometry and ergonomics a bit. Lengthen the oars. Raise the oarlocks and move them slightly more outboard. Stand one foot forward to get the leg muscles working with a for and aft motion.

    Presto- a stand up sliding seat rower.
     
  9. Clarkey
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    Clarkey Senior Member

    Not in my experience. I have done 50km+ days in both Venetian boats and Thames skiffs (fixed seat) and would choose standing up every single time. It is a very natural posture and stroke.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2020
  10. alan craig
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    alan craig Senior Member

    Clarkey, I just realised that the video I posted is the same boat you showed in my thread "Paddling a proa"! Did you have any problems leaving Thames locks when stand-up rowing? The spread of my oars was nearly the same as the width between lock gates and I was sometimes embarrassed when leaving the locks.
     
  11. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    doesn't look too efficient doing it either way. I can last an hour easy in Maas but I don't think I could do 10 mins in either position on that cat, but at least you can change positions easy.
     
  12. clmanges
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    clmanges Senior Member

    I realized it sometime after my other post; he's got to stand like that because that seat is in his way. You can see he's almost hitting his shins against it with every push. Giving him adequate space would change a lot, but yes, also raise the locks and lengthen the oars. Then he could get the oars out of the water on the recovery. The boat might still pitch a little, but maybe not; he's making very abrupt shoves as it is. A full load of passengers might smooth that out, too, IDK.
     
  13. Clarkey
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    Clarkey Senior Member

    I haven't rowed a Venetian boat on the Thames but have been through a few locks on the Brenta - we just paddled the boat through without putting the oars in the forcole. Gondolas have a particular bend in their forcole that enables the oar to be used for sculling like a yuloh when in very narrow spaces.

    It would be quite straightforward to bung a rowlock on the aft crossbeam of a cat to scull it out of a narrow lock I think.
     
  14. Clarkey
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    Clarkey Senior Member

    The experts make rowing with crossed oars ('voga alla Valesana') look easy but I think they would acknowledge that it is a smooth water technique only. Most 'Pattini' (or 'Mosconi', to use a different name) work as lifesaving boats in the shorebreak so it makes sense that they don't have much, if any, overlap. This video gives an idea:



    There was a comment about how the rower standing aft ensures that the waterplane is not symmetrical, even if the hulls themselves are. I think this does indeed mean that pitching isn't the problem it might seem at first glance.

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. BlueBell
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    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    Thank you, that was me, several posts ago.

    Nice surfing video!
    That is some technique he's got going on.
     
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