stainless feasability

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by orangutang, Apr 26, 2009.

  1. orangutang
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: northern rivers australia

    orangutang New Member

    i'm just an armchair yachtie but i'm curious as to what length a cat needs to be before stainless steel become feasable with cost and weight etc. i imagine it lies somewhere around the 14m mark. has anyone ever done the mathematics. is it a material that will have its day eventually? has this question been done to death before?:?:
     
  2. peter radclyffe
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    i hope stainless has its day, because it has the one thing we need from a metal, the ability to not rust ,even tho its ugly, however, until they make it without it being brittle, it is not safe-signed winjin pom
     
  3. pkoken
    Joined: Mar 2003
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    pkoken S/V Samadhi V

    Stainless is poor choice for hull construction.

    Have a look into Cupronickel if you are seeking never ending durability (with the associated budget!). Titanium and Monel could also be possibilities.

    I would prefer marine aluminum over stainless.
     
  4. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    i should have mentioned cost, if it was no problem i'd use ali/bronze
     
  5. pkoken
    Joined: Mar 2003
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    pkoken S/V Samadhi V

    Most stainless suffers from corrosion when it isn't exposed to oxygen. Hence stainless is not a good choice for submerged portions of a hull.

    Conventional steel has better properties for boatbuilding than stainless.
     

  6. peter radclyffe
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    true , i should have said s/s for fittings , corten steel or mild steel is fine for hulls
     
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