Stable Catamaran Designs for Bangladesh

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by manbil7, Jun 29, 2001.

  1. manbil7
    Joined: Jun 2001
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    manbil7 New Member

    Hello My name is Bill Mansoor and I'd like to ask the boat design experts on this forum some questions.

    In Bangladesh, we have (as you've very well heard) flooding throughout half of the year. This becomes a boon though when you consider the network of swollen rivers and canals that can be used for transportation. The Ganges, even a hundred miles upstream is three miles wide in Bangladesh during the monsoons. Ideal territory for river transports. However every year we lose hundreds of people in boat accidents during the monsoon.

    Expat Bangladeshi Engineers like myself are trying to standardize on a passenger boat design for Bangladesh that will be

    1. Possibly a catamaran (or not)
    2. Design considers local skills (preferably steel) and low building cost
    3. Design is very stable in high wind and wave conditions
    4. Carries about 150 people in high density seating configuration
    5. Speed is not critical, economy and stability are

    Your comments, advice and pointers to additional info and links are highly appreciated.

    Cheers,

    Bill Mansoor
     
  2. Stephen Ditmore
    Joined: Jun 2001
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    Location: Smithtown, New York, USA

    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    Ferry

    There's quite a bit of ferry expertise in Australia, so while I'm trying to think of a useful responce take a look at
    http://www.baird.com.au/
    clicking on "maritime industry links" and then "vessel designers and builders."

    Also, be aware that you should get advice concerning compliance with IMO (International Maritime Organization) regulations and classification society (ABS, DNV, Lloyds, etc.) guidelines. If you plan to insure the vessel your compliance with these safety guidelines will largely determine your insurance rates, as well as your vessel's resale value.

    Stephen Ditmore
    New York
     
  3. Stephen Ditmore
    Joined: Jun 2001
    Posts: 1,388
    Likes: 44, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 699
    Location: Smithtown, New York, USA

    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    Ferry

    I wonder whether the design at
    http://www.nqea.com.au/River_Runner.html
    would suit your needs? I would point out that a 100 passenger 30 knot aluminum ferry will carry as many pasengers in a day as a 200 passenger 15 knot steel one, with greater customer satisfaction and schedule flexability.

    Two designers you should check with who are not listed by Baird are Crowther and Tennant (please check your private messages for the links).
     

  4. Stephen Ditmore
    Joined: Jun 2001
    Posts: 1,388
    Likes: 44, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 699
    Location: Smithtown, New York, USA

    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    HSC 2000

    One more thought. You might want to obtain a copy of the IMO's HSC 2000. Go to www.imo.org, click on "safety," then "other safety topics," then "high speed craft." In discussing this question with builders and naval architects let them know that you want the ferry to comply with the damaged stability portion of HSC 2000 whether the vessel is "high speed" or not. This should insure a safe boat with adequate stability whether it's a monohull or a catamaran.

    If I can be of further assistance please write me at sditmore@netzero.net.

    Stephen Ditmore
    New York
     
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