Spraying my boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Graham2013, May 21, 2013.

  1. Graham2013
    Joined: May 2013
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    Graham2013 New Member

    Hello everyone I'm new to this site
    Iv got a small row boat I got today and I would like to spray it just to brighten her up abit I have a normal car filler in the shed and about 6 cans of automotive car primer will this be ok with a fiberglass boat
    Many thanks
     
  2. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    Spend some time and reap the rewards for you efforts !!

    To brighten up it cost more to make a quick she'll be right get it sprayed and out the door kind of a job than to make a good job !!
    So spend some time and do the prep work and make sure the paint sticks really well , then block sand and make it look a million dollars ,when the top coat is applied !!
    Auto paints wont last as long as proper 2 pot marine paints but at the end of the day its only really going to cost your time !! :D
     
  3. Graham2013
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    Graham2013 New Member

    Thanks for replying I'm planing on putting some serious prep into it make sure it's properly ready for painting I'd like to hand paint the boat with a primer and a high shine white can you advise on this please? Ie what brand of paints are best for hand painting and where can I get them
    Many thanks
     
  4. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    If by normal car filler you mean Bondo, no, that won't work. It is mostly talc and will soak up large amounts of water and come off in chunks and can't be reworked at all once it has gotten sodden. There are rafts of marine putties and glazes for fairing and filling dings. If you have your own polyester resin, you can start with a mix of equal parts by volume of bubbles, fulminated silica, and resin and then adapt that "mother sauce" to suit the task of the day. However it is rather slow to cure compared to most store-bought products.
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Fix any divots with a marine grade filler, not automotive. Over coat the repairs with a high build primer, preferably epoxy based. Block the primer down (long board) so the surface is smooth and fair. This may require several coats, if much unfairness is present. When ready for a finish coat, the easiest to apply by hand, that will produce results that rival a spray job are the single part polyurethanes. Use the "roll and tip" method (much available online about this technique) and eventually (a few weeks) you can buff it up to a fine finish if desired.

    80% of the effort will be surface prep, with 20% being roller or brush in hand time. The more you put into the prep, the better the end result.

    In London, I wouldn't know the first place to start for paints, but the local marine parts store is the logical place to start. Online sales is also a good place to find better pricing. Stick with the major brands, so you don't have compatibility issues.
     
  6. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    I disagree with Tunnels statement that automotive paints will not last as well as two part PU paints. The most durable of automotive paints are two part urethanes, I have used it on numerous boats and it is virtually bullet proof if applied correctly. Paint life expectancy for trailer borne boats about twelve to fifteen years. The auto paints most frequently used these days are called base coat/clear coat. That type is as poor choice for boats. Two part (actually three part) automotive urethanes will get the job done and stay done.
     
  7. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    Hi Graham,

    just a more personal note here being that I am partial to row boats. :cool:
    I wouldn't mind seeing a before and after pic when your done.
    it's just plain fun :D
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    All US automotive manufactures have switched to water borne coatings, changing over from the urethanes, previously employed for the last couple of decades. They have several distinct advantages of the acrylic urethanes, including DIY friendliness. Of course these are also two stage system (base and clear), but some are now developing single stage systems, for DIY.

    The other obvious choice for the DIY'er are the enamels and single part urethanes.

    If a trailer is properly setup, with well placed bunks, a two part automotive system can work well, though clear coat scratches will be inevitable. If the clear coat has a healthy film thickness (compared to an automotive application), you can buff out these scratches as they occur, for a while. Of course, this type of paint shouldn't be asked to live in the water for very long.
     
  9. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    If the idea here is just to make your recently purchased used boat a little more presentable and not a bang up expensive job, I see no problems with automotive polyester filler, primer and plain old marine enamel high gloss paint. As previously mentioned the key is in the prep. work and light colours are more blemish forgiving. Over the years I've often used economical automotive fillers, primers and marine enamils to tiddly up my dingys with excellent and long lasting results. Regardless of what you use over time it will sustain wear and tear. It all depends on what you see as the law of diminished returns.
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If all you want is to make the boat more presentable, alkyd enamel will do fine. It is cheap and easy to use. Apply the paint with a roller and use a brush to tip off the bubbles and level the paint. Unless you are looking for a showroom finish it will be fine. Also, there is nothing wrong with using Bondo for small scratches and dings.
     
  11. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    This thread has inspired me to give my boat a fresh coat of paint! :D

    (I used exterior house paint and it's holding up very well. (2 years)
     
  12. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Bondo and other automotive polyester fillers tend to shake out on powerboats, just from the vibration. If used in thin layers and in small amounts, it'll hold fairly well on nonporous surfaces. If used on porous surfaces and those where a good bit of movement can be expected, it'll pop right out.

    Agreed, most DIY jobs are best served with good prep and modest priced paints, like the traditional enamels and single part polyurethanes. You can roll and tip these to a very high finish, particularly if you wait for a full cure (a few weeks) then buff it up, to remove any remaining stipple or brush marks.
     
  13. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member



    Bondo is commonly used to fill very small imperfections after the primer has been sanded. Heavy gap filling against the skin is for epoxy bog .

    As Gonzo said ... with roll and brush, plus a quality paint like International applied to the manufacturers specs ,you will get Pro results. The advantages to roll n brush are less consumables and less harm to your health.

    The disadvantage is that two coats of topcoat are needed to build the correct film thickness...sanding lightly between coats. Hence extra labour.


    Too many folks waste money on the ultimate paint job. All paint jobs get ruined when you smash the dock...UV burns all paint.

    Go cheap and use best craftsmanship
     
  14. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    My statement about Bondo (polyester filler) is that it only works for small scratches. If you have a big hole it should be repaired before filling. Bondo is not a structural material.
     

  15. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Bondo bog greatly speeds up the project because it cures fast and can be sanded the same day. Very handy stuff...just dont get carried away.
     
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