SportzMaster 19 Power boat

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by Mark Bowdidge, Jan 23, 2009.

  1. Mark Bowdidge
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    Mark Bowdidge Mark Bowdidge (ARINA)

    SportzMaster 19 - Bowdidge Marine Designs

    We're bringing out a new power boat design and we're wondering what you think or it. Ive just posted below a brief overview of the design.

    "The brief for the SportzMaster 19 was simple. It had to combine the comfort for those family outings, whether it be swimming, diving or just enjoying the day, but at the same time she also had to satisfy those who are into serious fishing and competition.
    Not content though with being just another boat, where they all begin to look the same, the SportzMaster 19 had to be different. With her flared bows and strong sheerline, she had to be tough and rugged, yet simple in her concept
    Designed to ABS Power Boat scantlings, the SportzMaster 19 is a composite strip plank design while the interior framing and joinery is constructed from gaboon or Oakume plywood. Using Paulwania timber or Western Red Cedar as the core and sandwiched in epoxy and directional E-glass fabrics, this overall result's in a stronger, tougher and more durable "Composite" boat, while still retaining its lightweight construction.
    Overall, the SportzMaster 19 offers a great opportunity for those weekend fishing adventures for those who love to venture out on the water."

    You'lll find more information regarding the SportzMaster 19 and other power and yacht designs on our website listed below.

    So I'm curious, what your impression of the design? Looking forward to your remarks.

    Plans available in early Feburary 2009
    regards
    Mark Bowdidge (ARINA)
    www.bowdidgemarinedesigns.com
     

    Attached Files:

    • 1.jpg
      1.jpg
      File size:
      132.2 KB
      Views:
      5,143
  2. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    ok ok

    OK Mark.... we have seen... you build boats....;)
     
  3. gamecock413
    Joined: Jan 2009
    Posts: 15
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 20
    Location: SC

    gamecock413 Junior Member

    looks great.
     
  4. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,196
    Likes: 166, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    your link is broken.
     
  5. Mark Bowdidge
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    Mark Bowdidge Mark Bowdidge (ARINA)

    G'day everyone,
    Curious about the link being broken. Hope this works instead. On our website, you'll find rotating 360 degree pictures of the design. As the plans progress further, more pictures etc will be updated there, as well as here. At the moment we're getting a lot of enquirys regarding the design. We used to be in the big boat market ( 55ft and over), but with the worldwide economic downturn, we decided to come back down to the small boat market, where it's still moving.

    regards
    Mark Bowdidge (ARINA)
     
  6. Jango
    Joined: Aug 2005
    Posts: 519
    Likes: 7, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 63
    Location: Mid Atlantic

    Jango Senior Enthusiast

    Right clic and "open in new tab"
    It works fine
     
  7. Mark Bowdidge
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    Mark Bowdidge Mark Bowdidge (ARINA)

    SportZ Master 19 - Bowdidge Marine Designs

    G'day Everyone,
    Here's a few more pictures showing the stern view.

    Regards
    Mark Bowdidge (ARINA)
     

    Attached Files:

    • 11.jpg
      11.jpg
      File size:
      85 KB
      Views:
      677
    • 12.jpg
      12.jpg
      File size:
      74.7 KB
      Views:
      620
  8. KCook
    Joined: Jan 2003
    Posts: 171
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: Arizona

    KCook Senior Member

    That strong, high chine in the bow may work for 55 footers. But it looks VERY odd on a 19. Otherwise, sharp looking design.

    Kelly Cook
     
  9. Mark Bowdidge
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    Mark Bowdidge Mark Bowdidge (ARINA)

    Thanks Kelly,
    The strong high chine was designed for a specific purpose in mind.
    regards
    mark
     
  10. Mat-C
    Joined: May 2007
    Posts: 255
    Likes: 12, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 141
    Location: Australia

    Mat-C Senior Member

    Which is ?
    The chine looks to be very big up forward. Apart from the increased slamming this may cause, it can often produce a wet ride - quite the opposite of what you might expect
     
  11. CET
    Joined: Sep 2005
    Posts: 114
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Utah

    CET Senior Member

    I’ve never understood the reasoning behind this style of transom/motor mount, with the motor mounted to a large platform behind the transom. On this design it appears to waste a lot of useable space inside the cockpit and leaves very little workspace between the seat/live well and the transom. I would think a fisherman fighting a fish in the stern area would be constantly bumping his head on the rods protruding from the rod holders located behind the seat. Why not do away with the platform behind the transom, move that useable space inside the cockpit and mount the motor to the transom?
     
  12. Mark Bowdidge
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    Mark Bowdidge Mark Bowdidge (ARINA)

    G'day Mat-C
    In regards to the SportzMaster 19's chine width up forward, it's narrower than it looks. Generally chine flats should be roughly 3-5% of maximum chine beam wide from the midships aft, tapering to zero width at the stem. For the SportzMaster 19, at her transom, the chine flat width is only 3in (76mm) or 3.8% ,while a 1/4 length overall back from the bow, her chine flat width is only 1 in (25mm), reducing further to zero at the bow itself.
    Her forward section shape in the bow area, the sections are not flat or concaved (hollow is shape), like many alloy designs here in Australia, but are slightly convexed ( or bowed outwards) in shape, increasing hull strength , softening impact and making for a smoother ride.
    Hope this answers your question
    All the best
    Mark
     
  13. tom28571
    Joined: Dec 2001
    Posts: 2,469
    Likes: 113, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1728
    Location: Oriental, NC

    tom28571 Senior Member

    Very reasonable questions and my first impression also.
     
  14. Mark Bowdidge
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    Mark Bowdidge Mark Bowdidge (ARINA)

    G'day CET & Tom.
    Sorry for not getting back sooner in regards to your questions, but I'm presently flat out with work other than the SportzMaster 19.

    In regards to your question, the overall concept of the design is not only related to fishing but also swimming, family day outings and the like. In other words- a multitask design acceptable to a wider community other than fishing alone.
    CET, you asked previously and sorry for not responding sooner:
    "Why not do away with the platform behind the transom, move that useable space inside the cockpit and mount the motor to the transom?"

    This is a tough question because it has wider ramifications than what you think. So please bear with me as I endeavor to deal with each question and "why" in turn.
    As you know, the height of the transom is governed by the outboard leg length. In other words, the distance from the bolting clamps to the cavitation plate above the prop. The cavitation plate should be just below or almost level with the bottom of the hull.
    The SportzMaster 19, the outboard required is a long leg. This means the distance measured vertically from the hull bottom to the transom mounting top must be approx 19.5in. If we were to do away with the platform and use this as our transom, then the sheerline or gunwhale would be so low, it would render the boat useless. We could have a large cut-out in the transom, it would look horrible. Now for smaller dinghies/punts and the like, you can get away with this, but as a boat becomes larger, the sheerline or gunwhale also becomes higher. But unfortunately we can't scale up the motor leg length to suit. They only come in 3 leg sizes. This is why you see on many designs, designers incorporate platforms / outboards pods etc, because the transom height is governed by the outboard leg length.

    So you're now probably thinking, "Reduce the draft at the transom, thereby increasing the height of the transom above the water?"
    Well, you could do that, but at the expense of reducing performance and increasing the trim angle of the design while on the plane. The SportzMaster's rocker angle is zero. The optimum angle for planning is 4 degrees. By upsweeping the rocker aft to say 3 degrees, this means that the boat will now be planning at a trim angle of approx 7 degrees, increasing drag, fuel and reducing overall performance. This could now impede on the driver's ability to see over the bow. There are guidelines in this regard, and as we always design to the ABYC rulings, this also includes the driver's line of sight and field of vision.
    Now I could go on with this particular scenario, expanding further, but I'm sure that you can see, each part of the design process, relates to other parts of the design, and this is why it's called the "Design Spiral". There are more designs that end up in the waste paper bin than what actually hits the market.

    So, with the above out of the way, but without getting to technical, let's say for example sake, we went with your idea. Oops..we have a problem. Under the guidelines of the ABYC, we must incorporate an engine well. Being that the SportzMaster's HP requirement is designed for outboards between 75HP to 140HP, this means that the engine well depth (fore and aft) under the guidelines must be 30in. Also, the back of the engine well or bulkhead, must also be higher than the transom for safety. Now if we used a typical dinghy concept or layout, we will have lost 30in of useable area within the boat, which we can either flush over as a deck or turned in one form or another as storage compartments. (Hmm, another problem. If we turn it into storage compartments, this will bring the Centre of Gravity to far aft and will not be aligned with the centre of buoyancy, increasing our planning trim angle further- reducing performance)
    The SportzsMaster 19's engine well or platform depth is only 29 inches, but due to it's layout, we can we can utilize this option and turn it into a useable swimming platform for those family day outings where kids and adults can have easy access to get in and out of the water.
    As I've previously described, the design is not solely just a fishing boat. But like all vessels that are designed for multitask activities, you have compromises.

    Oh yea, in regards to the fish holders, their adjustable to suit the needs of the day and having 6ft 6in clearance, this means you won't be bumping your head in this area

    Every boat is different and so it should. Also everyone has an opinion of what makes the perfect boat, but every design also has its compromises. It basically boils down to "what is the intended nature or purpose of the design" Overall, the name of the design implies-"Sportz". Not "Fishing"Master 19. If it was, it would be designed differently again, solely and specifically for that purpose alone.

    I hope this answers your questions as to why I've done things the way they are.
    All the best
    Regards
    Mark
     

  15. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    I hope this answers your questions as to why I've done things the way they are.

    No has´nt......
    all I understood was cheap advertisement.
    And the hulk is ugly and not designed to every day´s needs.
    my € 0,02
    Richard
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.