Splashwell

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Paul_A, Oct 14, 2013.

  1. Paul_A
    Joined: Aug 2013
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    Location: Pohnpei Micronesia

    Paul_A Junior Member

    I am restoring a 20' Tolman skiff and will be adding a sealed self bailing deck to the boat. The splashwell bottom was rotted out so I have cut it out.

    My question is if I add plywood to close off the wide opening on either side of the motor can I eliminate the splashwell?

    Pics of the splashwell as it was and of a boat where the owner closed up his transom with sheet aluminum to show what I am considering.

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  2. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    djaus Salted Nut!

    I'm not an engineer but sounds like your on the right track. Depends what type of waters you plan to use the boat on I guess. Most smaller open top planing boats are built that way so I don't see why not.

    With a self draining deck/cockpit you shouldn't have any splash back worries. Have you thought about lifting the overall height of the transom/outboard mounting plate as well, maybe with a long shaft outboard? (if you don't already have one of course).

    The rigidity & strength of the transom is to be considered too I would think.
     
  3. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    The splash well may be part of the transom structure and provide strength to the transom.

    It might be dangerous to remove if you are operating with a high power engine.

    Perhaps post a photo of the complete transom structure
     
  4. Paul_A
    Joined: Aug 2013
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    Location: Pohnpei Micronesia

    Paul_A Junior Member

    The transom is separate from the splashwell and derives none of it's strength from the splashwell per the designer.

    The engine is a 40hp Yamaha 2 stroke and the boat will be used primarily outside the reef (small island in the Pacific) trolling or anchored for bottom fishing.
     

  5. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    djaus Salted Nut!

    If you're going on to the ocean then splash back should be taken in to consideration, either outboard induced if you stop suddenly or the ocean swell itself.
    As I stated before most small boats with an outboard have no splash well but this obviously limits the capabilities of the vessel. You'd need pretty flat seas to be confident.

    Only you know the conditions that you will go out in so it's at your own risk I guess (minimal risk I would think with near flat seas).

    As for the transom if the design dictates the splash well is "optional" then there should be no prob's in removing it. What's the purpose for removing it anyhow?

    If anything you could introduce some bracing to bolster up the transom-hull joint.

    I had a similar decision to make when working on the transom on my Hartley (next to your thread here on boat design).
    I had to remove some soft rotten timber (with the motor in place) & I was worried the transom might move/sag when I did. Nothing happened thankfully & I chose to rebuild the transom decking just to keep the configuration as close to original as possible. I did shorten the splash well though.

    Post up some more pics of the transom & the whole boat please.
     
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