Speedy knuckles

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by fallguy, Sep 21, 2017.

  1. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Is there any way to build a knuckle or cleat for attaching deck lockers in a corecell boat where you can attach the cleat and attach the base the same day above it? Or do you generally set your cleats with some fast epoxy in the morning n come back with the base in the afternoon?

    I'm just trying to avoid a day lost.

    In woodworking to avoid waiting for glue; we use mechanical fasteners, but seems wrong for 1/2" corecell hull.
     
  2. jorgepease
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    jorgepease Senior Member

    Picture? You might get away with using adhesives like Plexus or Sikaflex, the sika especially sets up pretty fast, can't remember which version I used for my rubrail base but it impressed me.
     
  3. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You can use temporary screws, then remove them and pour epoxy in the hole.
     
  4. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I mean the ones that go under watertights. The ones you never see again. Anyone ever use crazy glue? It and the accelerator make corecell smoke, but encapsulated in epoxy? Seems like a no brainer speed drill. And as bad as I hate nylon; a hot glue gun might be good. There will be no turning back and sanding it. Thoughts?
     
  5. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    The hot glue sounds good. It would take like five minutes to setup the cleats/knuckles. Then if the hot glue fails; it doesn't matter much because the stuff is tabbed in from above....i.e. Bunk bases
     
  6. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Hotglue is out. I am postcuring. During the postcure, the hotglue failure would be horrible.
     
  7. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I am back to the hotglue idea. As long as the cleats are glassed on from below.... So, you hotglue the cleat on, glass it from underneath, and then you can proceed with the decking.
     
  8. rob denney
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    rob denney Senior Member

    Intelligent Infusion. Get it all done the day before.
     
  9. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I have to admit you lost me there Rob.
     
  10. rob denney
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    rob denney Senior Member

    Sorry about that, maybe a bit cryptic. You are talking about adding the cleats on Monday and bonding them in on Tuesday. Intelligent Infusion includes them all in the laminate on Sunday. Not only quicker, but less material, no waste, no secondary bonds and no cosmetic finishing.
     
  11. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I understand, but in order to laminate the cleats in on the vac table or infusing; you'd need to locate them precisely using the CAD program. While I like the idea; it is a function of the design for sure. To laminate them in without absolute lines might be rather tough. As it is now, I will need to use the level to determine the location of the cleats as I did not have dxf files of the hull panels.

    Am I wrong? Would you agree that in order to use the process; you need to integrate the build into the design more?
     

  12. rob denney
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    rob denney Senior Member

    For a simple job such as this, there is no difference in integration between doing it in stages from raw materials and doing it all at once. Conventionally, you make a sheet of material, trim it to fit, cut out the hatch pieces, rout and backfill all the edges, glue and glass on the cleats (including lots of fiddly edges and corners), then fillet and tab everything in place, half of which is done blind, on your knees feeling around under the floor. This is why fitting out conventional boats takes so long.

    Intelligent infusion, you cut the foam pieces to fit, set it up, infuse it, remove the peel ply and glue it to a shelf which is part of the hull infusion and to the flanges included in the bulkhead infusion. Many times quicker (hours versus weeks), the job is perfect and there is zero material wastage, frustration, mess and sore knees.

    The floor, hatches and flanges on a 66'ter are shown at Custom 20m/65′ – NORWAY – Harryproa http://harryproa.com/?p=726#more-726 The peel ply was removed post infusion and the floor glued in place. The hatches fit perfectly, the cleats are integral with the floor. The more detail you wish to include, the more integration is required. For example, if the hatches had been hinged, we would have included the hinges (if they were composite) or rebates and solids for the screws to attach metal hinges. If a teak and holly, cork or nonslip finish was required, the layout would have been different. If it was to be a water tank, tubes for attaching pipes, inspection hatches and their rebates would be included. The result would have been the same: No sanding, grinding, cutting, edge finishing or secondary laminating required. A good design will include all these.
     
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