Southern yellow pine at HD?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Bob S., Jan 30, 2006.

  1. Bob S.
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: PacNW

    Bob S. Junior Member

    I'm about to embark on my first wood build (a ply on frame skiff) and thinking about my lumber choices here in the NW so doug fir would seem like a natural pick but holy cow the good stuff is really expensive (even here). So I'm wandering around the local Home Depot the other day picking up some stuff for a house project and I notice they are stocking what looks to me to be southern yellow pine in a 3/4 clear grade. This is rarely seen around here and the only reason I recognized it is that I used to build bowling alleys and that is what is used out beyond the maple ball drop zone. The sales clerks & managers couldn't confirm, they just called it clear pine (duh!). Anyway, has anyone sourced SYP at the HD or am I confusing what I saw there with something else? Thanks.
     
  2. wdnboatbuilder
    Joined: Nov 2005
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    Location: Cape Coral Fl

    wdnboatbuilder Senior Member

    Interesting I was in a Scotty's one day and they were selling Cypress, I wasa looking through and I picked one up and it was very light. I walked down the isle and found some sand paper, scratched it up and smelled. It was not cypress it was white cedar. The manager argued, and finally admitted that he did not know the difference.
    SYP in HD I believe it. Here in Florida they do sell SYP but full of knots and pretty useless for boat building. They do not call it SYP they call it pine.
    Hey you should feel pretty good they called it white pine down here they call it white wood, hell a little paint and I can call any wood white wood. I just call it sprucepinefir. Cuz you never know what your getting.
     
  3. Bob S.
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: PacNW

    Bob S. Junior Member

    It's a bit like Forest's box of chocolates in the home centers I guess . . . you never know what you're going to get.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If you purchase lumber or sheet goods from Lowes or Home Depot you'll have to get to know their lumber manager. He'll likely not know what the hell you are talking about, but may be convinced you'll buy some wood from him with a little "help".

    You can find all sorts of species called various names in these stores. They get what they can, most being farm raised white and yellow eastern pines. They usually carry 5/4's Douglas fur in the decking stock, plus cedar (not the best stuff in the world, but deceit flat sawn) poorly cut red oak, white poplar, sometimes a white or silver spruce and other less then notable varieties.

    All of this stuff is poorly cut for boat building. It's generally fast growing, widely spaced growth ring, material (maybe a weird hybrid) and you'll go through a pallet or three to find two good pieces of wood.

    As a rule Lowes/Depot is a crap shoot and not worth the trouble, unless you're there several times a week anyway.
     
  5. jpatarickwagner
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    Location: california

    jpatarickwagner Junior Member

    Home Depot material is kiln dryed. they pump hot water/steam,then suck all water out, to the point of almost no moisture content, then put moisture/steam backin to half of nature air dry. Or imagine a human, steam up first, remove 95% of water content, then put back half of normal water content. How much work do you think you would get out of that person. But you save money, just spend it on lifejackets. Na, They cost to much. term life insurance is better. Get a book on boatbuilding. read it, or have someone read it for you. AC exterior ply A is one good face, C is a crappy face of face, and the interior core are D or worse(bugs, holes to 2 or 3 inches, delamination is ok. Home Depot that right. They prefer "shop grade" = (total Defective Panel). I have a friend who makes Plywood for Home Depot. IF I want grade stamp, Its a special mill run. 35% to 50% higher price. plus I have to wait till the line is serviced 3 times a year.
     
  6. Bob S.
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: PacNW

    Bob S. Junior Member

    Nice post, reminds me of why I would never live in California
     

  7. jpatarickwagner
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    Location: california

    jpatarickwagner Junior Member

    my friends mill is in washinton state, but like you about california. My friend the mill owner, lives in california.
     
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