Source of wood strips

Discussion in 'Materials' started by vadim_go, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. vadim_go
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 41
    Location: NE USA

    vadim_go Junior Member

    After looking at some study plans (like 5 of them) and communicating with designers for some time I am kinda starting the planning process for my homebuilding project.
    Now, if I to believe the books, for one-off hull (I am talking about under 30 ft catamaran, no bridgedeck) Western Red Cedar strips, both sides glassed could be strong, light and easy to DIY build.
    After some time on Google, I am not being able to find a easy way to price the strips. I see some options for getting the planks and rip then/plane them as a cheaper option. However, I am not sure I want to invest my time into this.
    I would love to see clearly my options at least to some degree and plan accordingly.
    For ply and foam core, I can see the price options and suppliers.
    Could somebody help me with
    place to order and price options for WRC in New York/NJ area in US?

    greatly appreciate any help
     
  2. die_dunkelheit
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 70
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 71
    Location: The People's Republic of California

    die_dunkelheit NA Student

    Look at the ads in the back of Woodenboat magazine, there is at least one repetitive ad for strip planking material. As for literature, "The Gougeon Brothers on Boat Construction" has a great chapter dedicated to this construction method (5th edition, chapter 23 page 265)
     
  3. vadim_go
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 41
    Location: NE USA

    vadim_go Junior Member

    Yep, did
    both of them. Got the book, looked at the WB magazine. Better than nothing, not that good. Cove and bead strips only.
     
  4. die_dunkelheit
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 70
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 71
    Location: The People's Republic of California

    die_dunkelheit NA Student

    Sorry for the dead end, I haven't needed to source strips yet but will keep that in mind as I may be starting a project myself soon.
     
  5. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Sourcing Boatbuilding Wood is a mysterious process. Give wood finder a look to see if there are any suppliers in your region then contact them with your specs. http://www.woodfinder.com/
     
  6. david@boatsmith
    Joined: Aug 2008
    Posts: 124
    Likes: 13, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 75
    Location: Jupiter Fl USA

    david@boatsmith Senior Member

    If you contact me with specific sizes and quantity I would be happy to provide you with a quote. David 561 632 2628
     
  7. John Riddle
    Joined: Aug 2008
    Posts: 34
    Likes: 5, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 63
    Location: Vermilion, Ohio

    John Riddle Junior Member

    1 person likes this.
  8. Nick.K
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 328
    Likes: 24, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 103
    Location: Ireland

    Nick.K Senior Member

    I don't know the timber market in the states, but here (Ireland) a lot of the western red that is sold is aimed at decking and garden installations. I have machined a fair ammount, much of the timber was barely dried, I remember one occasion where sap was actually spinning off the cutters. The degree of dryness is absolutely crucial with strip plank/ epoxy. Who-ever you choose, I suggest you check the humidity of the timber before paying for it.
    Nick.
     
  9. vadim_go
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 41
    Location: NE USA

    vadim_go Junior Member

    Thanks a lot,
    once I get over the weekend (long weekend, no School, kids all over my head) I will work on the info provided.
     
  10. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    And remember that boat building timber will be expensive. The local shop selling boat building quality wood only keeps a small inventory of high quality timber. When He mills to your specification you recieve a pallet of timber that is preselected and ready for fitting. Very little waste.
     
  11. cthippo
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 753
    Likes: 37, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 465
    Location: Bellingham WA

    cthippo Senior Member

    It can be, but there are other options.

    I made my own strips from scrap lumber with a table saw and a chop saw. the trick is to rip your strips down to the correct size (I used 1/4" x 3/4") and then use the chop saw to cut out defects. Once you have strips of clear wood, you can scarf them together to form a hull.

    Post # 10 in this thread shows how I made the strips for my current build. The material was scrap lumber from a house that was being remodeled and cost me nothing.

    Assuming you have the space and the ability to not cut off any part of your body, a used table saw and chip caw will cost you a lot less than what you would spend on pre-made strips.
     
  12. vadim_go
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 41
    Location: NE USA

    vadim_go Junior Member

    Yes,
    I can make a cut and have all my limbs attached to the body after that. I even have a table saw and miter saw. However, right after the price of the materials comes my time. And from my experience in woodworking/home-improvement I know that I do a decent work for much longer time that other people. Hey, even the bad work I do takes a lot of time:). So if I can speed up the process somehow... Plus, I do not expect to find any lumber for free regardless how much time I work on it afterwards. It is for 8m catamaran build I am talking about. I would like to avoid being boggled up in the project so early, like, before I even start actual building.
     
  13. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 2,578
    Likes: 120, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1650
    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Let me ask you something.. when you glue few strips in place what you do when you wait them to set? It takes only 30 min to saw the strips for the next patch..so you have still hours left to wait..
     
  14. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Guess it depends on the builder and the boat. A decent tablesaw , bandsaw is expensive and takes up space. If you're building a complex boat then obviously you need fixed equipment. For many small boats its impractical and better to purchase timber machined
     

  15. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 2,578
    Likes: 120, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1650
    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    In this case... ;)
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.