Something like a Carver 32 after cabin cruiser, but on one level?

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by lance linked, Mar 29, 2016.

  1. lance linked
    Joined: Sep 2015
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    Location: Pennsylvania, USA

    lance linked Junior Member

    My brother is in a wheelchair, but is buying a house with river frontage on the Severn River (MD) and is looking for a motor-cruiser that could double as a live-aboard for extended winter cruises to Florida. He should be getting 3-3.5' dockage.

    I have been looking at Carver 3207 types from the mid 80's as a cheap live-aboard, but the up and down of them is not good for his condition. I also understand that they are more of a planning type hull and are not fun in more than 2-3 foot swells, so are not really blue water capable.

    Is there a boat in a similar class that is better deep water capable, with similar roominess, similar price range in the 15K-30K$ mid-80's to mid-90's vintage, and all on one level (or mostly so)?

    Your thoughts?
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Making a boat ADA compliant is quite a job. In the small size you mention it, with blue water capabilities, only a custom build would fit the bill. Also, any boat in that size will make it very hard for someone on a wheelchair to move around in any swells. Some people in wheelchairs have done extensive cruising, in sailboats, by installing a rail system and using a modified wheelchair. Keeping everything on one level would mean a really tall boat, which in turn means longer and wider.
     
  3. lance linked
    Joined: Sep 2015
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    Location: Pennsylvania, USA

    lance linked Junior Member

    I suppose it is a given that twin engine boats with semi-vee hulls will have engines paired on or about the centerline for dynamic balance. I wonder if any boats have been built with engines split, one on each side, on the length centerline, but with a passage between. this would seem to be a reasonable solution that would result in a continuous floor on single plane, in 2 (or 1 1/2) levels for a reasonable height limitation of 16' from keel to topside. Assuming a 12' beam and a length of about 32', you really would have a "Winnebago of the seas".
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The spacing between engines is barely enough to squeeze in for service in a boat that size. There is no way a wheelchair will make it.
     

  5. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

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