some parts of Stringers Rotten

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Palmeroni, Aug 21, 2018.

  1. Palmeroni
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Location: Ireland

    Palmeroni Junior Member

    thanks for the reply James , and the pointing out the transom to me :) , it seems solid when tipping with hammer from outside , i did not test inside yet tbh but i will.

    I did plan on adding 2 layers of fibreglass mat/cloth to the whole bottom of boat and up transform , then coating all with more thickened resin with a dye to save on painting.

    my main concern now is the 2 holes that lead under the transverse support or a floor, can i just fill these with resin ?

    the actual timber seems fine when i done test drills its dry and solid top and side.

    :) i should of posted here 1st , but i only drilled 4 test holes about 1/4 inch into timber to see if it was rotten or not so i hope im ok here.

    we did drill 1 hole straight through the hull to let out water initially but i will be adding a bung to this and resealing
     
  2. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    Location: Columbus, GA

    JamesG123 Senior Member

    Are these holes you put in it? Or are the rot/damage to them?

    There are supposed to be holes or gaps under the stringers to allow water to drain from sections of the bilge towards the bilge pump.
     
  3. Palmeroni
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Palmeroni Junior Member

    this 2 holes are not for water or bilge pipes etc , i can see these ones. the 2 i have seem to go under the transverse support at a 45 degree angle and goes down 2-3 inches .

    some said to me these may be for taking in water to balance the boat when she is on the water
     
  4. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    That's not likely. A balance ballast tank would be in a.... tank. Not just the bottom of the sump. Are they just drilled thru the transverse or are they glassed in?
     
  5. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Holes under the floors or transverse frames are called limbers and are designed to remove water; rain water even.

    The hole in the boat is not bunged in repair. You need to grind and area around the hole and glass it from the inside with several layers that extend about 12 times the hole diameter or for a 1/4" hole; a 3" circle. Personally, I would go a bit bigger.

    You would use about 3-5 layers of glass and reduce each one about 1/2" or say 2",2.5",3",4",5", for example.

    Once this is done; you sand smooth the exterior whilst not sanding through the glass and fair the outside and paint or gelcoat.

    To check for core; you use a light hammer or butt of a screwdriver and bang the inside of the boat. If the hull is separated; you'll know.

    As another poster has opined, probably not cored and this is good news for you.

    Transom testing needs to be done from inside. Transoms typically rot due to ingress, so check them near any through holes or screw holes near the bottom.

    It is a much easier repair if the transom is solid.

    Be careful to well mark all your test holes. If you forget to seal them; they are future rot starters.

    Is the boat indoors or out for repairs? If outdoors; repair the hole at the end. If you have her inside, fix the hole for a first lesson in glasswork.
     
  6. Palmeroni
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Location: Ireland

    Palmeroni Junior Member

    the holes look like drilled or just appeared very small 5-6 ml , the transverse is solid as such
     
  7. Palmeroni
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Location: Ireland

    Palmeroni Junior Member

    thanks re the holes called Limbers i am learning all the time

    re the hole in boat : is it not a good idea to have bung to allow water to drain when not in the water? this hole is about 3 foot back from very front of bow, if you suggest now adding a bung i can follow your advice and fill with glass. i was going to add 2 layers of glass over all the bottom anyways with extra thick dyed resin on top .

    re test holes i will mark all with pink spray paint so they will all be filled in afterwards

    Boat is outdoors at present but under a tarp.

    thanks again fallguy
     
  8. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    Holes in the bottom of the boat that you can close are called "seacocks". If the drain hole you put in is in the very bottom of the hull, imagine what will happen to the outer fitting of the "bung" valve WHEN you drag it across rocks. This is why seacocks are usually not in the very bottom but in the lower sides or rear of the hull.

    Who knows but they weren't original to the boat. Something else to fix.
     
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  9. Palmeroni
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Palmeroni Junior Member

    yes these are not limber holes , so just fill with resin and glass over them ?
     
  10. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

  11. Palmeroni
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Palmeroni Junior Member

    perfect thanks James
     
  12. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Pay close attention to James on the matter of bungs. They are a dangerous thing and not used. You can install a seacock, but the location to the bow is odd.
     
  13. Palmeroni
    Joined: Aug 2018
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    Location: Ireland

    Palmeroni Junior Member

    yes on thinking now i will fill this hole , as we only drilled it to drain the water out to move the boat to my house. as the boat was 1/3 full of water.

    I will start cutting out 1st stringer tonight or tomorrow and will post updates

    thanks for all the help and advice guys
     
  14. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    You need to do a reality check here. It's obvious you have little knowledge of boats or the scope of what you're attempting. There is no telling what your mechanical abilities are or what tools you might have or what facilities you have to work in.

    This project will cost multi thousands of dollars, many hundreds of hours and the odds are it will never get finished as the thrill of doing something will be replaced by the daunting realization of how much there is to do, and that boat rebuilding or restoration or repair is usually just a lot of dirty, grubby, unhealthful, uncomfortable work.

    Keeping the original shape is very important, but you've already taken the cap off with no provision to keep the sides from sagging outward. You are planning to
    "adding 2 layers of fibreglass mat/cloth to the whole bottom of boat and up transform , then coating all with more thickened resin with a dye to save on painting." There is no reason for that, you have no idea how to do it or how much work it would be to do it, but somehow it's the plan.

    I'm not saying don't do this project, but I am saying you don't realize what you're getting into.
     
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  15. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I did not note the cap was removed. If so, why?
     
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