Solo Expedition experiment

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Steveca4, Nov 9, 2019 at 7:51 AM.

  1. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
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    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    At 63 I still enjoy going out on extended trips solo, end of the road and up the river kind of thing.
    Worrisome for the family and sometimes even scare myself when I hit bad conditions.

    So...I've bought a cargo canoe that I can manage alone. 16' long, 41" at the beam , 17" sides, seat fore and aft. I've also just bought an 8' inflatable boat without the floor. Pictures of both below. I bought the inflatable tubes with D rings on the outside and inside of the tubes in hope of using them to mount the tube assemble around the front exterior of the canoe.

    This should make the canoe all but unsinkable unless something very serious happens all at once. It will provide additional flotation, much more standing stability and keep waves splash down.

    The tubes are still in transit so I have some time to think about how I should attach/mount the tube assembly to the canoe. Open to any and all suggestions.

    much appreciated
    Steve
     

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  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Sounds like an excellent way of providing additional buoyancy.
    I can see 3 D rings on each of the inboard sides of the inflatable tube. If you use these to simply try to lash the tube in place, I think it will be a bit 'floppy' - ie you won't get a tight fit unless you also run straps around the outside of the tube as well.
    A rather unorthodox / left field suggestion - would it be feasible to cut slots in the topsides of the canoe hull for the d rings to fit in to?
    You could then have tapered wedges going through the D rings on the inboard side to hold the inflatable tube in place. And maybe have locking pins so that the wedges cannot come out easily.
    If it is going to be a permanent affair(?) you could also perhaps seal the remaining slight gaps in the slots in the hull with a suitable sealant?
     
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  3. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    Nylon straps, an anchor below the tube, and one above as needed to hold the tube in place when the boat is swamped.

    Easy to remove, easy to install, and very secure.

    Looks like a good idea.

    I’m 63 and live in a very remote area on the water. I go on long hikes where even radios have a very short range due to the topography. Break a leg and I wouldn’t be missed until dark, and they’d have no idea where I may have wondered off to.

    When on the water I’m far more carful than when I was younger, and my inflatable vest is my best friend.
     
  4. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
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    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    Good idea, I'll look at this closer, whole winter to figure it out, almost freeze up here.
     
  5. Steveca4
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    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    thanks this idea too!
     
  6. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    Won’t that make it hard to maneuver?
    Any additional wetted surface adds drag, how slow do you want to go?
    I’d hate to try and paddle it into a headwind!
    Canoes have been the expedition craft of choice for a lot of years, and can survive some very nasty water without floaties.
    Why not just get a LRB if that’s what you need?
     
  7. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
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    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    The canoe is a square stern cargo canoe, it operates with an outboard. The inflated tubes will up off the water by about 6".
    I'll have a 6 hp on it pushing the bow. Its rated for a 10 hp.
     
  8. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Barry Senior Member

    I would consider adding a solid foam perimeter around the gunnel, less hassle than keeping the tubes filled with air, less drag, no problems installing in your aluminum canoe

    Simply a wide (and you could chose the width) foam collar attached to the gunnel

    Sportspal Canoe
     

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  9. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    Steveca4,

    You'll be fine, just figure a way to fasten the tube on.
    And invest in an auto inflating PFD.
    Pressure activated, not the dissolving pellet type.
     

  10. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    How much do the tubes weigh?
    Inflatable boat tubes are built real stout, may be weighty for a canoe, especially if carried high, could affect stability.
    Check out Gheenoe (sp?) it’s made for motoring, with canoe lines. Very popular in Florida backwaters.
     
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