Soling or Yngling as a daysailer

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Alexander UA, Jul 29, 2017.

  1. Alexander UA
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 35
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Ukraine

    Alexander UA Junior Member

    Hello Gents,

    Could you please advise whether there were attempts to create a cruise daysailer on a base of Soling or Yngling? The idea is changed cockpit for 3-5 passengers and 2-4 berths under the deck.

    If so are there information available on who has build such a re-makes and where they are available nowadays?

    Today's aged yachtsmen who were sailing Olympic classes are interested in some classical yachts for holidays ).
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,554
    Likes: 372, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    I don't think you can carry 5 passengers; that is 6 people total and have 4 berths. The hulls simply don't have the volume.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 471, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yeah, you can make this type of conversion, but these are relatively short LWL designs with as Gonzo points out limited hull volume. You might get sitting headroom in a cuddy style of cabin, but it'll be tight and will also look like a big box sitting on the deck. This is major surgery, so weight will be a major consideration. Think light, build light and put as much crown in the roof as you can to help hide the boxy look.
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,554
    Likes: 372, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    I think that two berths on either side of the mast may give you enough space for two people to lay down. However, it will take a fair amount of cockpit space.
     
  5. Alexander UA
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 35
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Ukraine

    Alexander UA Junior Member

  6. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
    Posts: 297
    Likes: 75, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 39
    Location: Germany

    Rumars Senior Member

  7. Nnnnnnnn
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 60
    Likes: 1, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 12
    Location: MOW

    Nnnnnnnn Junior Member


  8. CT249
    Joined: May 2003
    Posts: 1,228
    Likes: 65, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 215
    Location: Sydney Australia

    CT249 Senior Member

    The bottom one's deck is very similar to a fairly popular conversion in Australia, which had a similar (but very slightly lower) wedge style cabin. It was very small down below; a tiny galley and two quarter berths if I recall correctly. One of them was national champion in the under 30 foot offshore class. The topsides were raised about 100mm, I think, and it had a genoa. The Australian boats followed the normal hull lines rather than being bulkier as in the boats pictured.

    Speed was a little bit quicker than a late '70s quarter tonner, I think.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.