Solar Generator

Discussion in 'Electrical Systems' started by MaddMatt, Dec 8, 2020.

  1. MaddMatt
    Joined: Oct 2020
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: buffalo ny

    MaddMatt Junior Member

    Ok, I know that term gets thrown around a lot but I am curious about the possiblity of using them on a homebuilt.

    Typically a SG has a bank of batteries, DC, USB and 110 plugs (with pure sine wave invertor). The can usually charge while they are powering devices as well making them a good choice for solar.

    My thought was to include a couple of these in the 1000-2000 watt range to power a dc fridge freezer, water pumps, led lights, and whatever else I might need. I could wire the solar panels right into them so they are constantly charging. I could add a small generator as a backup to charge the batteries or use the alternator off the outboards. They are much lighter and smaller than comparable lead acid batteries to boot!

    My understanding is that I would not need zincs and, if placed appropriately, wouldn't need as much wiring in general. If I ever wanted to upgrade or need to replace, it is a simple swap.

    Has anyone else tried this? Is there something I'm missing?

    Matt
     
  2. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
    Posts: 980
    Likes: 404, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 39
    Location: Germany

    Rumars Senior Member

    What are you talking about? Can you give an example? As I understand it you are talking about a box with lithium batteries and inverter. If yes the setup is only as good as the individual components and the builders integration.

    Zincs have nothing to do with your onboard electrics, and the amount of wiring depends on what you want to power.
     
  3. MaddMatt
    Joined: Oct 2020
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: buffalo ny

    MaddMatt Junior Member

    Sure! I currently use two jackery 500 units for my food trailer to power everything inside including 2 60liter aplicool freezers / fridges, lights, fans, chargers and everything else.

    I chose the jackery's because they have a nice warranty, pure sine wave inverter, regulated dc output and USB outputs (including a usb-c). It was also priced right for 500w. I believe I paid around $400 after a discount code.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07SM5HBK1/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_fabc_I8m0FbZ3ZCPCE?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

    I currently have 2 although one will take care of all my power needs for about 8 hours. I figured for the boat I'd go with a bigger unit for the galley so even with a couple cloudy days I could keep things powered up. Id have to add up the power requirements for electronics to see what those needs would be and figure in lights, chargers, tv, fans and everything else...

    Matt
     

  4. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
    Posts: 980
    Likes: 404, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 39
    Location: Germany

    Rumars Senior Member

    I see, yes you can use them as long you respect their limitations. Charge and discharge can not exceed the ratings given by the manufacturer, keep a lead acid battery connected to the alternator.
     
    MaddMatt likes this.
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