SOF Row Sail Motor Micro Cruiser???

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Steveca4, Jun 1, 2018.

  1. Skyak
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 1,194
    Likes: 25, Points: 38, Legacy Rep: 152
    Location: United States

    Skyak Senior Member

    If you see the value in my points the next step is to quantify them in terms of design.

    You should start listing all the things you intend to carry, their weight, and at least the 2 largest dimensions. To carry that stuff, you need enough boat. This is where the negative design spirals become apparent.

    For the environment you would make a grid with all the possibilities, how often they occur -and your ability to predict and deal with them.

    As you develop this list, the talented crew here at BD.net can help evaluate the performance capabilities of each concept.

    Bears are a topic of their own. They can't be stopped, but they can be fooled and dissuaded.

    What I am getting at is to put your proposed designs up against their intended environment while they are in the concept stage. As you consider compromises you can do virtual float plans -then see how you would fare against real weather results. (note to self : this would make a cool D&D style board or computer game!)
     
  2. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 35
    Likes: 0, Points: 6
    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    Thank you Clarkey, good leads, I will follow up on them.
     
  3. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 35
    Likes: 0, Points: 6
    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    Thanks again Clarkey, that does look pretty inviting and comfortable, but I'd need to put in more floor boards to make moving around a bit easier. I'm aiming for strong and under 80 lbs if possible. I have a method of getting a boat on my roof racks. If one end is under 50 lbs I can manage it ok.
     
  4. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 35
    Likes: 0, Points: 6
    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    Yes, the Angus Row/Sail cruiser is a very nice design. It would do everything I need but it would need to be trailers. I've asked Colin about a SOF version and it would need a lot of added lumber to make it feasible and that would make it too heavy for the car topping.
     
  5. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 35
    Likes: 0, Points: 6
    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    Agreed! that is very interesting. If built in parts

    Have you come upon any plans for these boats? In English or good drawings with dimensions?
     
  6. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,839
    Likes: 276, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Just had a look at the video again. It IS a great concept.

    How is this for a solution. I bet Colin could design a "split hull" version. A hull join where the cabin ends and the cockpit starts.

    You would then have two hulls both under 40 kilos.
    That would make an easy to handle, car toppable, multi powered, Ocean going craft.

    What a package.
     
  7. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 35
    Likes: 0, Points: 6
    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    Good idea! I'll ask him.
    thanks
     
  8. Clarkey
    Joined: Aug 2010
    Posts: 105
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: UK

    Clarkey Senior Member

    The only plans I have come across are these from BCA Demco (available through Duckworks):

    [​IMG]

    Moschino http://65.110.86.132/plans/bca/moschino/index.htm

    It seems to be going a little in the wrong design direction for me - I am imagining something no longer than around 4m and ultra-simplified to keep weight under control. Some basic dimensions for traditional types can be found on some of the manufacturer web pages like this:

    Mosconi a remi in legno, pattini a remi in legno| De Biagi & Magi Cantiere Nautico https://www.debiagiemagi.com/mosconi-legno.php

    If you hover over the pictures some dimensions pop up - typically about 4.25m long, 1.7m beam (across the rowlocks) and 1.4m beam across both hulls.
     
  9. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 35
    Likes: 0, Points: 6
    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    Thank you Clarkey, I'll check out that link. The deck seems overly high on this Duckworks version. I think I'd make the deck right on top of the pontoons, like that Italian fellow did. I mistakenly thought that man's name was Pattino, I didn't realize that was the boat's name. I emailed him today to ask if he had build pictures, drawings or plans for the boat he build. That one seemed longer than the traditional 12'?
     
  10. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 3,817
    Likes: 153, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 971
    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

  11. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,839
    Likes: 276, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Thats pretty much what I would have expected. If you look at how the underneath frames distort as you hammer an SOF, you see where the energy goes.

    If you ran that canoe up on an oyster shell, or serrated rock, you trip would be over, maybe many miles from the car.

    His comment about fiberglass is completely nonsense, as it would be a lot tougher with pointy objects than his nylon.

    On one canoe trip, we started developing leaks in a traditional canvas canoe. Luckily I had brought along a small pot of brushable, bituminous "paint" ( named Pabco Brushable Hydroseal). It was thick enough (like smooth peanut butter) to block screwdriver shaped holes by itself, but if you made a "sandwich" of it with another bit of canvas or other substantial fabric, you could slap it on and start paddling again straight away. It "dries" underwater, and always remains flexible.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2018
  12. Clarkey
    Joined: Aug 2010
    Posts: 105
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: UK

    Clarkey Senior Member

    His name is Luca Gentilini - he has a bunch of videos on YouTube:

    luca gentilini https://www.youtube.com/user/gentiliniluca/videos

    He also sometimes chips in on the Woodenboat forum and seems an excellent chap. I believe from earlier comments that his boat is about 19' long.
     
  13. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 35
    Likes: 0, Points: 6
    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    Hi Clarkey
    • I did a 2d mock up of my Pattino tri. My pontoons would all be 6" wide x 12" x 12' long. Two pontoons would stick out the rear 2' and the center pontoon would protrude 2" out the front. The deck would be 6' x 8', made in two sections. It would be designed to be five parts, 3 pontoons and 2 deck sections. On this practical platform I would be able to stand and row forward, mount a small 30lb outboard, and somehow rig a small simple sail. On the deck I'd either use a boom tent or some other kind of tent, plus seats with storage compartments. Everything would break down to parts I could secure to my small truck roof.
    • how did your modeling go?
    • Steve
     

    Attached Files:

  14. sailhand
    Joined: Jan 2017
    Posts: 97
    Likes: 19, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 29
    Location: australia

    sailhand Junior Member

    Hi Steve can, I have a small 3.5 metre catamaran that has a full self draining deck and gets along quite well with a 3 hp motor.

    A few lessons I learnt during the design phase whilst running prototypes without a full deck forward is that they are very very and did I say very wet. The large deck area also makes for a great spot for pitching the small pop up tents available these days. We use ours as a spare room when the grandkids are onboard and they love it. If we are in a nice secluded anchorage we put the dinghy onshore with the wheels and turn it into a upmarket campsite for them. The advantages of the catamaran form with a large deck between the hulls is hard to beat for accomodation. Getting in and out of the boat in deep water is a doddle with the hulls hanging past the tansom. You can use the outboard leg to stand on and help sit your backside on the transom. From there you can take off your gear and throw it in the boat and then climb aboard. The hulls sit about an inch and a half below the water with my 108 kilograms on them so it is a very easy boarding solution. The slider catamaran is a good layout for a camp cruiser however you want something that rows which limits your beam somewhat. We are in the process of fitting a hobie bravo style battened furling rig to the dinghy to further increase its diverse role as tender/lifeboat/fishing platform/diveboat/excercise machine and soon to be sailing boat. Obviously there are compromises with all things boating but we think this style of vessel offers the best all round small craft that we could think of. As for loading and unloading check out the rhino side loader in australia. These are very simple to make and you can load and unload your dinghy with a battery drill.
     
    rwatson likes this.

  15. Silvertooth
    Joined: Nov 2016
    Posts: 90
    Likes: 1, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Uk

    Silvertooth Junior Member

    This puddleduck racer converted to a cruiser is the ultimate all rounder.

    Its a micro house boat. Or a livaboard micro cruiser.

    My design is also to make it amphibious. So it can be cycled from inside the cabin. With fins on the wheels so it be cycled on land and into the water as a peddleboat, then back out of the water and carry on cycling on land to your next camping spot.

    amphibeous micro cruiser.jpg download (1).jpg images (1).jpg download (2).jpg download (3).jpg download (4).jpg
     

    Attached Files:

Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.