So very very cheap for a 62 footer...Why?

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by sabahcat, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I think Dick Cole would be shaking his head at the vessel in this thread, the idea that air under itcould play a forward role it's performance is nonsensical, unless there was some supposition that it was going to be 'lubricated' by aerated water flowing along the tunnels. The truncation aft could be intended to facilitate easier turning, but whatever surface area was reduced there was minor compared to the rest of it.
     
  2. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    I built a small boat similar to this except mine had skegs to hold air under flat area. It kind of work. It pounded and was a small light boat. I realized that air lubrication doesnt work that easy because air doesn't displace the weight of the hull. I think they were trying to invent something here and they built it full scale without proper testing.
     
  3. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    I'm no designer,but it seems that 18 knots would never generate enough air lift.

    So basically instead of fooling around with all this stuff,I'm thinking it'd have been better just to do a planing hull.....or put on some foils.
     
  4. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    That boat can help but plane with that large flat area in the back. But flat bottom boats have a whole set of issues. I am surprised it isn't more efficient if not comfortable.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Question is, what is in front of that large flat area ? How does the gullwing end ? Certainly looking down through the tunnels it (the gullwing shape) does not seem to 'wash out' but ends suddenly. A view from the rear would have been helpful. Had the whole thing just carried through to the transom, the nose might not be pointing up the way it is. Not that it would have made any sense to have it that way either, it just creates a lot of wetted area to drag along.
     
  6. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    My guess like the airslot the added a step before flat area. So will plane on three points, flat area at transom and 2 areas behind tunnels. Kind of like a hydroplane. But who knows. The problem this design doesn't work is it only good at one speed, one sea state and particular loading. Any alterations would effect the balance and it would never get on plane properly.
     

  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Maybe the step isn't vented properly, but it is just speculating without further information.
     
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