So... Chine runners?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Floatything, Feb 19, 2019.

  1. Floatything
    Joined: Sep 2018
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    Floatything Junior Member

    Hi,

    While researching building methods I came across Matt Layden's Sharpie designs with chime runners. Has anyone tried these with a boat bigger than a micro sharpie?
     
  2. JSL
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    JSL Senior Member

    Do you mean Chime or chine ?
     
  3. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    I'm sure he means "chine". Context.

    I can't think of anyone who has used his embodiment of lifting strakes in a larger craft, but others might know of some?
     
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  4. JSL
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    JSL Senior Member

    Saw some photos but a drawing of the hull cross section with the 'runner's might help clarify things. Not sure if they help performance but might:
    (a) dampen or steady boat roll and heave. Seen similar fittings on commercial boats (30'-80') and they call them 'rolling chocks'. Larger than bilge keels but more effective at slow speeds or stationary
    (b) steady boat on the beach when boarding.
    on the 'down' side --> will increase wetted surface area & resistance
     
  5. Floatything
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    Floatything Junior Member

    Sorry, keyboard got the better of me. Yes I meant chine. They seem like horizontal bilge keels.

    <thread title updated>
     
  6. JSL
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    JSL Senior Member

    Thanks - I try not to assume... we are talking boats after all!
    The rolling chocks I mentioned are larger and protrude further from hull. More important, they angle down about 20 -30 deg.
     
  7. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I am guilty of being a google expert on this one. I hate to coin in, but admitting zero knowledge as a caveat.

    I was curious is all.

    But you can read and find that draft is an essential component and must be 1/5th of beam. So where these fall apart is ANY other ratio. And that makes at least gutcheck sense. At some point; they would seem to do less than a deeper draft alone.

    A great article.

    Jim Michalak's Boat Designs/The Index http://www.jimsboats.com/1nov14.htm#Chine%20Runners
     
  8. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    They are not. Besides Fallguy's link, do a search at the bottom of this page and then web search on Matt Layden, Sharpie, and Enigma. They have been discussed many a times.
     
  9. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    And, by the way, this is not dissimilar to a keel or skeg on a canoe. It helps them avoid sideways slip in a beam wind. If they have enough draft for their beam, unneeded.....etc.
     
  10. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    But that's 1/5th when heeled, 1/10th when unheeled or level.
    According to the diagrams in the article anyway.
    It's not exactly clear to me...
     
  11. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I am really not qualified for any debate.

    But, in general, it appears as the draft of the vessel deepens; the draft does more to reduce slip than any chine runner can.
     
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  12. Phil Faris
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Phil Faris New Member

    I'm surprised that even when designers "go rogue" and break traditional design rules, they seem to stop short of "trying everything". For example, I've not seen the chine runner extension fixed to the bottom instead of the sides of the chine. I've thought of bolting an inverted railroad track under each chine on a flat bottomed cruiser instead of an iron keel. For cruising I'd think one needs a stiff boat, not a tender one. Combined with a scow hull, possibly?
     
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