Small Tri's under 20', any mention of foils is banned..

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by waynemarlow, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    The Trinado looks gorgeous.
     
  2. Russell Brown
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    Russell Brown Senior Member

    Doug, I designed the boat with the help of Paul Bieker. It was one of the first projects we worked on together. Besides a couple of smaller flaws, it is a great joy-ride machine.

    It originally used Tornado hulls for outriggers, but my client asked Nigel to design new ones for the boat, so they were built in female molds.

    Warwick, the photos that you posted were of Paul and Charlene Bieker sailing the boat.
    Paul and I owned the boat together for a year or more and Paul sailed the living crap out of it.

    Russell
     
  3. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Thanks, Russell-it is an outstanding design with such a light weight. I would love to sail her!
     
  4. warwick
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    warwick Senior Member

    thanks Russel for the information, I find it an interesting design.

    I feel it is tricky to get accommodation in a tri at that size
     
  5. rcnesneg
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    rcnesneg Senior Member

    At one of my local marinas, there is a guy with a Farrier, he says it's 19 feet wide. He has it in a slip during the summer. I'm not sure where it goes in the winter, because the lake freezes over... I don't know how wide the trinado is, but in this case, he didn't seem to have trouble getting a slip for it. He probably pays more, of course, because it takes up more room...
     
  6. basil
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    basil Senior Member

    Guy's here is what most people would agree is about as good as you're likely to get in 21 feet. I know its over 20 feet but a good looking simple boat.

    http://www.delaveaumultihulldesign.com/tri-designs.php

    I guess you could adapt it to using donor floats and rig rudder etc.

    Tony
     
  7. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Corley epoxy coated

    Too bad that the member here "themanshed" hasn't posted any further updates on his carbon 20' Kurt Hughes trimaran build. It would seem the project has been abandoned as no updates since 2011.

    http://themanshed.com/tms-20-trimaran.html
     
  8. mundt
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    mundt Junior Member

  9. waynemarlow
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    waynemarlow Senior Member

    A few posts ago I asked the question on why modern cat donor hulls are not suitable for Tri's, I have my own theories but looking for other comments.
     
  10. mundt
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    mundt Junior Member

    the L7 in the vid uses cat hulls but it was found that the freeboard and buoyancy weren't optimal so they kept the bilges of the cat hulls and added freeboard with glass and ply. Works very well. I'm sure that a Searail type boat could easily get away with using some good beachcat hulls as the loads and power would be more in line for the design of said hulls. The Ted Warren boat uses amas that look even less buoyant than most beachcats. It looks very fun and fast but I bet in the ocean it would be extremely wet and might not go so well as I think the akas would be under water a lot.
     
  11. waynemarlow
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    waynemarlow Senior Member

    Certainly the older style hulls are restricted in volume, when you look at the likes of the older Hobie hulls and even say the Tornado, the modern F18 hull is just beach cat hulls on Steroids. They are tall, over 600mm and nearly 400mm in width at their widest point with very full foward volumes. They have changed a lot in recent years.
     
  12. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    -------------------------------
    I think modern cat hulls could make good donor hulls IF you had access to their plans and hydrostatics or take the time to create that information from an existing hull. I was going to use the F16 Blade hull as the mainhull of a small tri-I got a good deal on it. BUT when I wrote to the designer he said that he'd rather I didn't- especially if I was going to publish pictures of the finished boat. So I let the deal go.
     
  13. davefried
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    davefried Junior Member

    DIY outriggers

    While it would be nice to save the effort of building outriggers by going the donor route, there are a few negatives as well.

    Matching attachments to beam design.

    Carrying mass from unused rudder and centerboard structure.

    General condition and possible effort to restore older hulls.

    The visual appeal of a moulded outrigger matched to a more angular flat panel hull.

    Why not DIY the outriggers as well? For the subject trimaran, how about 5.5 m loa, l/b around 14.4 and 800 l displacement.

    Any thoughts on desirable features?

    Mounting slightly nose down has been mentioned. How about rotating about the long axis to move the centerline further out.

    Considering the hull shape, is volume down low preferable to a sharper entry?
     
  14. hump101
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    hump101 Senior Member

    Why wouldn't you use the rudders and centreboards on the outer hulls, and save space/weight in the centre hull, also would be better when flying the centre hull?

    A modern F18 hull can easily support an additional 300kg before sinking, so should be enough to support flying the centre hull.
     

  15. davefried
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    davefried Junior Member

    Centerboard location

    If the SOR includes flying two hulls then using a cat hulls with rudders and boards in place is a benefit. Exciting but a bit more than what I had in mind.

    One rudder means no linkage to rig and de-rig when folding. One board is accessible without clambering about a pitching boat to operate. Just my SOR.
     
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