Small Tri's under 20', any mention of foils is banned..

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by waynemarlow, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    You've got to watch increasing beam too much with small amas and without ***** because the chance of pitchpole increases.
     
  2. warwick
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    warwick Senior Member

    the overall beam seams to be restricted to the folding technique, the scarab 22 is 5.6 m wide overall. I would have to look up the scarab 650.
     
  3. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    Let me present myself as a potential buyer: sailing for 35 years, largely on 20' monohull day boats and 25' cruiser racers. Twin 13 year old boys and a grin and bear it wife.

    A willing but inexperienced (of fast, twitchy boats) crew. I would like a Farrier/Corair 28, but realistically fall into this 20-23' section (I have admired the Multi23 for years, there being 2 at our club).

    I like the Ultralight 20 and Searail 19 (Mk11 larger amas). I don't understand why the 19 has raised amas and the 20 is a flat design when they both look fast boats. I accept at this length it will be a day boat with cuddy. I want a good looking boat - boats must be beautiful. I have no time for any of this **** cr@p that clogs up the forum from time to time.

    So I am Joe Public. What do you have for me?
     
  4. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    So do you want to build or buy. Keep the boat in the water or at home and day sail

    Will you sail in flat water or at sea in waves?

    Do you want to race?

    The more you tell us the better we can advise. As Adhoc says, it's all about getting an accurate SOR at this stage

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailngcatamarans.com
     
  5. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    My response above after ++.
     
  6. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

    Small Tris

    I really like the Scarab tris wood or foam, folding beams good stuff !
     
  7. waynemarlow
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    waynemarlow Senior Member

    RHP, I would guess you are pretty representative of those looking at this type of boat. Have you considered the TC627, I'm not sure its gone into production yet.

    The Husky series of boats seems to offer an alternative using donor cat hulls, we all seem to talk about Beach Cats not being good donor hulls, why is that ?
     
  8. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    So do I but the designer says on his website the 650 for example is designed for sheltered water.

    Wayne, looks a nice boat however built by Andaman Boatyard who have a certain reputation on this forum.
     
  9. waynemarlow
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    waynemarlow Senior Member

    At 20 ft aren't we really in the realms of inshore and coastal sailing only ? I know bath tubs have sailed across the Atlantic but having been caught out in the Solent, which is realitively sheltered waters, by +30knots on a 20 ft Cat, it soon got all a bit scary. Certainly if we had had the ability to reef down which the Tri would give a much better option of, it would have been less of problem, but these light weight Tris with tall wing masts, are going to be a handful in a big breeze. Certainly in over 20 knots and no sail up, my F16 is good for about 6 knots downwind, add in a bit of superstructure and 3 hulls and I can imagine these T20 boats are not going to be unsimilar.
     
  10. mundt
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    mundt Junior Member

    to sir lord, the only "beachcat" i can think of that is near 23 feet in length would be the stiletto 23. it being very fast but legend has it that it's quite prone to going over and quite a handful in breeze. But if you put the same rig on a multi 23 I'd gues the Multi would give it hell in most conditions.
     
  11. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I've sailed a Stiletto 23. A hairy boat to sail, partly the two trapezes. Mainly the boomless mainsail with a 10:1 mainsheet that had really high friction. Even in 15 knots wind it would not run out by itself. I don't remember it being particularly quick. The similar Rainbow Racing cat was though

    Richard Woods
     
  12. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Clearly what I need to do is find a builder who wants to build a round bilge foam sandwich moulded main hull to my design. Then add the beach cat out riggers and rig. After all the bulk of the cost of these boats is in the rig and fitting out, not laminating the hulls.

    That way one could buy a very good performing boat for a fraction of the cost of buying a complete one.

    In fact just like the Typhoon and Hurricane designs I worked on when I was a designer at Derek Kelsall's in the late 1970's

    Any ideas of suitable builders?

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  13. mundt
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    mundt Junior Member

    sounds pretty similar to what Mike L. did with the L7. And it's an excellent boat! I'm sure you could come up with something very nice too.
     
  14. hump101
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    hump101 Senior Member

    You could try Chantier Naval du Grand Val near St Malo in France (+33 2 99 88 55 07 or luc@nacrafrance.com). Speak with Luc or Benjamin. They have built several foam Farriers to an excellent standard and were the Nacra dealers (and have a lawn full of potential donar boats) and speak English. Shipping to the States/Oz would be prohititive unless you have a full container (maybe 4 in a 20 TEU, so around €750 per boat for shipping, but if you left the decks/bulkheads off you could stack many more). I can personally recommend them.
     

  15. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Richard,

    I don't follow your logic. "After all the bulk of the cost of these boats is in the rig and fitting out, not laminating the hulls."

    If the bulk of the cost is in the rig and fittings, why are you talking about the hull? Granted it might be an easy target, but you are trying to reduce the cost on the minor portion of the boat.

    If you had a foam sandwich design, couldn't you supply that to homebuilders as a strip planked design?
    My major objection to building your boats is the plywood design, my ego wants something I find better looking.
     
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