Small trimarans under 20'

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Doug Lord, Jun 24, 2012.

  1. Tiny Turnip
    Joined: Mar 2008
    Posts: 748
    Likes: 180, Points: 43, Legacy Rep: 743
    Location: Huddersfield, UK

    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    I'd be very interested in any links for a UK based mini coastal cruiser to rival the Astus 20.5, when any information becomes available. Thanks.
     
  2. Vantage475T
    Joined: Aug 2016
    Posts: 102
    Likes: 31, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Lymington,UK

    Vantage475T Vantage475T

    No problem.

    There will be lots more info available from hopefully the middle of March onwards - I will be making extensive videos and documentation

    Yes the plans are still available - if anyone is interested please contact me and they will also be appearing on the website as soon as it goes live in March.

    Currently they are only available in larger printed format but as soon as I can I will be getting them put into various digital formats.

    The new website has full forum capabilities for build logs and a specific secure area for the builders with paid for plans, so they can both document their builds publicly and get support from Len and myself.

    I'm also speaking with a company to find a path to be able to offer CNC cut kits as well if that will help get more builders involved.

    I've also planned to scope out the option of being able to buy the hulls and beams in various states of build to help speed up the process for builders who can then finish them and the project overall as they wish. That is some way off but on the roadmap for sure.

    Yes this is a swing wing so it is a variant of the Seaclipper series and everything else that has used it.

    The floats swing forward when not deployed though whereas I believe the Seaclipers swing aft.

    I do feel that the floats not being able to swing backwards is probably a good idea in case of any accidental non locking or peculiar breakage. The tramps will also obviously add a lot of tension each side and will prevent any accidental folding. I will certainly be testing if it is possible to launch folded, then motor off and let the floats "autodeploy" through the force of the water while moving. With an updated rigging of the tramps to facilitate simple locking by pulling hopefully one line from the central hull, it will further help reduce the launching process which is already not particularly arduous.

    Another difference is that the beams are canted at an angle on ours to gain the advantages of the dihedral shape while the Seaclippers, Astus and Pulse etc I think are all horizontal beams.
     
    Cholsson likes this.
  3. Vantage475T
    Joined: Aug 2016
    Posts: 102
    Likes: 31, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Lymington,UK

    Vantage475T Vantage475T

    Tiny, I will keep you updated. If you would like to pm me your details I can keep you up to speed directly .

    Have you sailed the Astus 20.5? Where are you based?
     

  4. Tiny Turnip
    Joined: Mar 2008
    Posts: 748
    Likes: 180, Points: 43, Legacy Rep: 743
    Location: Huddersfield, UK

    Tiny Turnip Senior Member


    Thanks - that would be great. I'm currently in Huddersfield, but having recently retired/downgeared, I'm planning to move to the West coast of Scotland where my favourite sailing is, as soon as planning permission, property sales etc. allow.

    I've not sailed the Astus yet, but plan to pop down to Southampton to have a go as soon as lockdown allows. I currently sail a lightweight, modest rigged 16ft open tri, which I love to bits, perfect beach hopping camp cruising.

    (the ketch rig)

    However, it is obviously limited in the conditions and range it can tackle safely.

    The considerable extra speed and seaworthiness of the Astus or something similar, would extend the viable sailing grounds somewhat! However, I'm love that my current boat can be picked up and carried up the beach, which is a great advantage on a lee shore, heavy shore break, rough/ bouldery shores. I'm used to sleeping on a small boat too - (I used to own a Winklebrig, which was tiny, cute as a button, but hard work to sail. ) but I'm familiar with the anxieties and discomfort that can go with it, so I'm not going to give up the portability without significant other advantage.

    pm on its way.
     
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