small square rigged vessels

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Guest, Sep 4, 2003.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I am trying to get information about small (not model) square rigged sloops. I am thinking about purchasing one or perhaps building one from an old hull. I recieved the name Merritt Wallace to try and get some information but I am not having any luck on the net getting info.
    Thanks
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The name sloop, in modern terms, means a boat with a mainsail and a jib. Throughout history the name has been used to describe different types of rigs. Which one are you referring to?
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I am looking for something unique to either build or possibly buy. We have a good sailing lake close to where I live and I love to sail, but every boat here looks the same its just a matter of length and a few different options. I am not into the boats speed so racing is not an issue. I would like to have a big enough main deck that I could have some people like maybe 10 on it for a meal without everyone sitting in a U shape holding there plates on there laps. One issue I have to deal with is the largest slip they have is for boats 50' or less, but I can go up to 24' wide if I put it in a houseboat slip. Thanks
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Which part of the country are you in? I can help you with finding and/or modifying a boat if you are within a reasonable distance. Another important thing is the maximum draft the boat can have.
     
  5. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I live just outside of Yankton SD. I will check to see what depth the area aropund the Marina is. It is Lewis and Clark Lake and I am fairly sure it has deep water. the Lake is approximately 10 miles long (or so I am told) and makes an excellant sailing lake due to its running east west. Thanks
     
  7. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    If you go the path of obtaining a surplus ship's lifeboat and building wooden topsides atop it I'd be interested in lending advice/guidance. I've looked into it and believe this approach could give a person looking to build the size and type of vessel you are interested in a big jump start. Many lifeboats are already equipped with a small diesel, drive components including shaft & prop, and a rudder. They're well built and the shape is about right.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2003
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I've seen converted lifeboats. They sail surprisingly well.
     
  9. Paul Browne
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    Location: Tampa, Florida

    Paul Browne Junior Member

    There are a couple of lifeboat hulls for sale described on my website at http://www.geocities.com/geezerboat.

    No, I don't have any financial interest in their sale. I have a converted lifeboat and I'm just interested in encouraging others to do something similar. I've often pondered how differently my boat would have turned out as a sailboat, more lead or steel in the bilge, a couple of leeboards, a drastically lower cabin, flusher decks, and a nice low gaff or lug rig....completely different. Could have been an ocean crosser.

    No doubt you can save a lot of time, and money too I think, starting with the hull done.

    Paul Browne
     
  10. Paul Browne
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    Location: Tampa, Florida

    Paul Browne Junior Member

    Forgot to mention that I took some lines off my hull. So if anyone becomes serious about it, you could study them as a typical lifeboat shape.
     
  11. Crescent Moon
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    Location: Vermillion SD

    Crescent Moon Junior Member

    Thanks for the info. I am looking to go ahead with the project. I have contacted a couple of hull design/builders. I will look at the lifeboat aspect. I have recieved a lot of negative feedback from a couple of my sailing buddies so I appreciate the support.
     
  12. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Maybe your fore and aft sailing buddies want to save you. It is sacrilege to become a athwartship sailor.
     
  13. Crescent Moon
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    Location: Vermillion SD

    Crescent Moon Junior Member

    Maybe. I know the one friend thinks its sacrilege that I am not interested in renting it out. The other might be worried that my shop won't fit both his boat and my new project.
     
  14. Stephen Ditmore
    Joined: Jun 2001
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member

    I take it C. Moon is the "Guest" who started this thread...?

    I'm happy my lifeboat idea met with a positive response. I still believe it's a very appealing way to go if you want to end up with something that looks like it sailed out of a Patrick O'Brian novel, but in miniature. I see the lifeboat hull low in the water once the vessel is ballasted, with the gunwale of the lifeboat hull running just below the lower edge of the gunports.

    But is that what you want? You mentioned you're on Louis & Clark Lake. Reuel Parker's 36' Egret sharpie design looks a bit like the Louis & Clark keelboats. www.parker-marine.com/prices.htm You could substitute a dipping lug rig like Phil Bolger has on his own boat (http://home.comcast.net/~michaelgalvin/ResolutionPage.htm) for Parker's gaff rig. Not exactly square sails but similar.

    There's also a nice 30' schooner that was in WoodenBoat Magazine aboout 10 years ago. I think the name was Morningstar, and the designer, builder, and author of the article was Christian Dahl. For a time the plans may have been available from the WoodenBoat Store, but I don't see them listed there anymore. You could fly a single square sail from the forward mast downwind, or you could modify the rig more extensively.

    Those are a few thoughts from me, but what's your vision? Did you find anything of interest using the links at http://boatdesign.net/forums/showthread.php?threadid=1893 ???
     

  15. Crescent Moon
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    Location: Vermillion SD

    Crescent Moon Junior Member

    Yes, I was originally guest. I wasn't sure if I would get a reply to my message so I didn't think it was necessary to register. I am thinking of a 40' to 50' three masted "galley". With a raised aft deck to provide for a cabin below. Windows across the stern. Single sail on the front and rear mast and a main and top gallant on the main mast. Fairly classical design. I was thinking about the lifeboat as a base hull. then adding on to the sides to raise them out of the water. Big issue is it needs to be broad enough in the beam to handle the main mast without tipping over. The great thing about the lifeboat is it also has a built in motor which I would need to get in and out of the marina. One of the web sites was about exactly what I ws looking for, but the biggest square rigged boat they sell is 15'. I emailed them about a bigger hull and they said they are looking for investors to develop a bigger model and would I care to invest. I don't think I am interested in that. I have the man power to build if I had a good design. We do a lot of Victorian and Queen Anne style house remodels and the crew works well with unique issues and design. I understand that ths would be a novelty boat on a lake where everything is McGregor's and catamarran's, but although I love sailing this is a challenge also. Thanks
     
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