Small plywood boat...

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Donnie, Jul 28, 2015.

  1. Donnie
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: Central Texas

    Donnie New Member

    I am thinking about build a small plywood boat this weekend. The "Mouse Boats" look like a simple plan, easy to build and great for small rivers and creeks to fish out of.
    My 14 year old son wants a kayak, but the prices are very high and figured a small flat bottom, "Mouse boat" may be a good alternative.

    The question I have is with glues. Is gorilla glue (expanding polyurethane glues) a good glue to use to adhere the material to each other or would it be better to use something like Titebond III "waterproof glue"?

    I have been reading different information and may say that a good exterior paint is acceptable to cover your boat with.
    I was thinking about Olympic Rescue It (for fences), Rust-Oleum Epoxy paint for garage floors, or some roll on bed liner for the outside of the boat and maybe some exterior latex paint for the interior.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Donnie
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Gorilla glue is waterproof and a better choice than Titebond. A kayak won't cost more than a skiff, both will use about the same material. I built a dingy for my sailboat with Menards 5.5mm underlayment plywood. It works fine, even though it won't last as long as the $95.00 a sheet marine plywood.
     
  3. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    exterior house paint is fine for a boat that will not spend its life in the water like a large keel boat. Gorrilla glue is an excellent choice, I have also used tightbond III but it is not really suited for below water line use. It is rated as water proof but in extended underwater conditions it softens and turns milky white. Not sure I would want that below water line, but is okay for laminating a mast or making a tiller, gluing and screwing down a deck, etc.

    the skiff is a different kind of boat, more suited for fishing, than a kayak. kayaks are more for exploring or touring around over longer distances. You can build a skin-on-frame kayak for about $100 worth of materials with only a few hand tools. Use polyester lacing cord and lash the stringers to the frame, steam bend the frames (some use exterior grade plywood and cut out frames), cover with 8 oz nylon or polyester fabric by hand stitching a single top seam, and seal it with polyurethane floor finish (4 or 5 coats). From a pile of raw materials I can have a kayak on the water in less than 20 hours of build time.

    there are lots of internet sites and youtube vids that show you how. it is fast to build, and inexpensive. I have built perhaps 20 skin-on-frame kayaks, or small sailing canoes or trimarans.
     
  4. Donnie
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: Central Texas

    Donnie New Member

    Thanks for your responses.

    My son wants to save money for a store bought fishing kayak from Academy Sports and Outdoors. If I can build something in a few days he/ we can be on the rivers in not time!

    The skiff (Mouse boat, Rats Flat boat) is what I am going to do. They seem pretty easy and straight forward to build.

    I am not sure the wooden kayak will work and Petros you confirmed than for me.

    The question on using garage door epoxy is more for protecting the bottom of the boat. I figured if it was tough enough for a car it may work for a boat.
    Then Olympic Rescue It deck paint is thick and states it will fill 1/4" cracks. I though maybe it would be good for filling the cracks in the edges/ joins of the wood.
     
  5. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    There are lots and lots of wooden kayaks.
    No reason why they shouldn't work.
    Seems like you want to go for absolute minimum cost.
    No suggestions on an appropriate boat.
    But look on the following sites for mainstream ply kayaks.
    clcboats.com
    http://www.pygmyboats.com/

    for skin boats
    http://www.kudzucraft.net/Kayaks/
    http://web.archive.org/web/20120126104803/http://yostwerks.com/
    gentrycustomboats.com

    There are lots of other sites, some with free designs.

    You might also get the book "Build the New Instant Boats" by Harold "Dynamite" Payson (he has other similar books). You can build direct from the book, no other plans.

    http://texasfishingforum.com/forums/ubbthreads.php might have boats you find better suited and is aimed local.
     
  6. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    A simple pirogue would be fun to build also, and good for fishing and exploring. Without a deck you need a little more freeboard than a kayak, which means a higher seat to still be able to paddle efficiently with a kayak paddle, which in turn means a little more beam, but by building it yourself you can find the right fit that will work very nicely.

    I would go just under 16 feet, which can be done with just one scarf joint. I would not go any narrower than 24" nor any wider than 28". It might be hard to go as narrow as 24" without a deck or side tanks. I would build some floatation into the sides so it will be very stable when swamped. Then it starts to more of a kayak but there you go. A skin on frame deck might be an option. I like to be able to scramble over my deck to get back into it if I tip, but the foredeck could be skin on frame and the aft deck and side tanks could be plywood. Have fun with whatever you come up with.

    "Jambalaya (On The Bayou)"

    Goodbye Joe me gotta go me oh my oh
    Me gotta go pole the pirogue down the bayou
    My Yvonne the sweetest one me oh my oh
    Son of a gun we'll have big fun on the bayou
    Jambalaya and a crawfish pie and fillet gumbo
    Cause tonight I'm gonna see my ma cher amio
    Pick guitar fill fruit jar and be gay-o
    Son of a gun we'll have big fun on the bayou

    Thibodaux Fontaineaux the place is buzzin'
    Kinfolk come to see Yvonne by the dozen
    Dress in style and go hog wild me oh my oh
    Son of a gun we'll have big fun on the bayou
    Settle down far from town get me a pirogue
    And I'll catch all the fish in the bayou
    Jambalaya and a crawfish pie...

    Later on, swap my mon, get me a pirogue
    And I'll catch all the fish on the bayou
    Swap my mon, to buy Yvonne what she need-oh
    Son of a gun we'll have big fun on the bayou
    Jambalaya and a crawfish pie...

    - Hank Williams


    Here is somebodies pretty sweet looking interpretation.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Just had a co-worker come over to discuss wood epoxy building.
    He has an 11' x 35" welded aluminum pirogue.
    His new boat will be 11'x 30" based on his experience.
    He is also lowering the side height from 12" to around 9".
    The wood boat is hoped to be less than 40# instead of 100#.

    But the aluminum is a gorgeous boat and could be used for ramming crocodiles!

    FYI, the 11' is for carrying in the bed of a pickup.
     
  8. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    I built this red kayak for my wife out of mostly salvaged wood that I ripped into stringers. total cost was about $60, and $40 of it was the 9 oz nylon fabric. It weighs about 19 lbs, 15' x 22" wide.

    I built a similar size west Greenland type skin-on-frame for my daughter as the other brown kayak, but without the hatches. It weighs about 16 lbs. similar material costs, much of it salvaged lumber that I remilled on my table saw.
     

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  9. Donnie
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: Central Texas

    Donnie New Member

    I think I am going to try building this boat for my first.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Bought material tonight and going to start in the morning :)
     

  10. jorgepease
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Location: Florida

    jorgepease Senior Member

    one gallon of epoxy will let you glue the entire boat (thicken it with sawdust) it's very strong, plus have enough left over to probably coat at least the exterior hull. It's a $100 cost but so much more value and you will have a boat that lasts you for quite awhile.
     
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