Small fast-built sailboat: Bolger Junebug, Storer GIS, or ???

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by kengrome, Apr 6, 2008.

  1. kengrome
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Gulf Coast USA

    kengrome Senior Member

    Hello all,

    Recently I've been thinking about building myself a small sailboat. My goals are simple:

    1- relatively inexpensive
    2- relative light weight
    3- very fast and easy build
    4- big enough for two adults and one small child

    I'll use the boat along the coast, and I live 1000 feet from the sea so I expect to use it a lot. I will more than likely build myself a dolly to haul the boat back and forth.

    I've read good things about Bolger's Junebug and Michael Storer's Goat Island Skiff, but I do not want to limit myself to considering only these designs since there are probably others just as good or maybe even better for my needs.

    Please help me by suggesting any sailboat you know of that will fit my needs. There's no need to be shy here either. If you tell me why you're suggesting a particular boat -- or why you're discouraging me from considering a particular design -- then maybe I can learn more about the features of each boat and end up making a wise choice.

    :)
     
  2. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Bolger Black Skimmer. Light and fast, trailers behind a car, sleeps two adults and a kid. 25 ft.

    Alan
     
  3. kengrome
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Gulf Coast USA

    kengrome Senior Member

    Thanks Alan!

    Black Skimmer is a beautiful boat, but it is also a bit bigger, more costly and more time consuming to build than I need right now. I guess I should add some more goals to my list in order to keep future suggestions more in line with my current thoughts:

    5- no longer than two sheets of plywood
    6- no cabins, and no need to sleep aboard
    7- very easy and quick to rig for sailing

    The boat I'm hoping for does not have to be fast on the water (fast is nice but not necessary) ... and it does not have to be big enough to sleep in either. I'm really thinking about a very simple boat to use purely for day sailing.

    A boat that's somewhere around 12-16 feet might make the most sense in terms of keeping the cost affordable and the build time low, while still being able to take my wife and son with me.
     
  4. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    So many to pick from. Some are easier to build than others. Single chine plywood has got to be the fastest to build. Many skiffs answer that description. A flat iron skiff is a versatile boat, able to row, sail, and motor while being about the simplest to build with the exception of the banks type dory, which rows very very well but motors only with added complexity and sails rather poorly.
    WoodenBoat publications sells plans to quite a number of flat iron skiffs. They can usually be built in plywood at low cost. Probably the best bang for the buck afloat.

    A.
     
  5. kengrome
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Gulf Coast USA

    kengrome Senior Member

    Agreed, which is why this will more than likely be the construction style of the boat I choose.

    I would prefer a boat that is a great sailboat even if it doesn't move well under oars or engine power. Both the GIS and Junebug are basically flat-iron skiffs, aren't they?

    I looked on their website but so far I haven't found any that use the term "flat iron" in their descriptions. I did find this one though, which I assume is an example of what you're talking about:

    http://www.woodenboatstore.com/prodinfo.asp?number=400-106


    [​IMG]
     
  6. alan white
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    http://www.bateau.com/proddetail.php?prod=CV16

    I think I led you astray with WoodenBoat. Try the boats at the above website, and in particular the scow shown in the immediate link.
    A flat iron skiff is shaped like an iron but I'm seeing that most are for rowing at first glance, yhough plenty have been designed to sail.
    Also try Duckworks, Selway Fisher, Atkin plans.
    The skiff pictured was featured in a WoodenBoat article. I'd suggest you read the article for more info. It is a dead-simple design, and a good first boat, answering exactly your criteria as far as I understand it.
     
  7. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Cape Town South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

    Attached Files:


  8. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Not lacking for sail area!
     
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