Slavishly copying commercial trawler plans for a cruiser

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by makobuilders, Mar 6, 2014.

  1. makobuilders
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 131
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta, USA

    makobuilders Member

    Hmm, so I'm curious on your various thoughts of the Malahides, Romsdals and other heavy trawlers whose specs are nearly the same. Or is hypocrisy allowed when speaking of the aforementioned because they are old, wooden, round bottom and romantic to think about?

    Seriously, how about some subject feedback from those of you who consider yourselves knowledgeable in design. If we started a brand new thread about building a brand new Romsdal from scratch, what would the comments be? Under what circumstances (or SOR) would you recommend this course of action?
     
  2. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,307
    Likes: 191, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    I think forum member Eric Sponberg has already been down that road....

    http://www.sponbergyachtdesign.com/Molokai65.htm
     
  3. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 3,900
    Likes: 197, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 971
    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    If you put construction cost and fuel cost issues aside....why wouldn't it work? What's to wonder about? If the boat itself doesn't just weigh 20 tons more than most of the same size, and you can actually carry 20 tons more stuff than most boats of the same size, well, you could carry a car along with you. You could carry small cargo loads to out of the way places etc and have your trips paid for.

    Or maybe you're wondering about the hull shape, it's sea keeping qualities and if it's suitable for world travel? I wouldn't know about that, but others would. I would imagine if it's designed to be heavy, you have to keep it heavy with something or other, just to make it perform right.
     
  4. Westfield 11
    Joined: Apr 2008
    Posts: 215
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 95
    Location: Los Angeles

    Westfield 11 Senior Member

    I have cruised from Sitka to Vancouver several times in the Ursa Major a 65' wooden Romsdahl trawler and while it was a quaint romantic old boat it too suffered from the issues mentioned above. Heavy, slow and not very economical and not much interior room for the displacement. Berths were cramped, ditto the heads and salon. Headroom was very low too below.
     
  5. Mike Nickerson
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 14
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 20
    Location: Weeki Wachee, FL USA

    Mike Nickerson Junior Member

    Wow it would only take about $19,000 (USD) to fill the diesel tank! Way outside of my spending window.
     
  6. makobuilders
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 131
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta, USA

    makobuilders Member

    I forgot what the prices are like back in America. Here we pay less than $1 per gallon for diesel.
     
  7. JLIMA
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 123
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 130
    Location: New Bedford Ma.

    JLIMA crazed throttleman

    $4.24 this morning......
     
  8. makobuilders
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 131
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Atlanta, USA

    makobuilders Member

    :eek: WOW. If I'm ever gunna bring this thing back home to America then I oughta think of something a bit more fuel efficient. Perhaps 4.24times more fuel efficient!!
     
  9. Easy Rider
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 920
    Likes: 46, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 732
    Location: NW Washington State USA

    Easy Rider Senior Member

    Anything to excess is … well .. EXCESS.
     
  10. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 4,519
    Likes: 110, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Might be worthwhile to tow a huge bladder of fuel for USA cruising.

    In a few years USA Diesel should be well under $2.00, but it will be a while., so bring enough to cruise till 2020!
     
  11. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 1,374
    Likes: 56, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 746
    Location: Vancouver

    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    This name and boat sparks a memory- in passing by the Broughton Archipelago a few years ago...lots of blue trim on her?
     
  12. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,307
    Likes: 191, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

  13. Easy Rider
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 920
    Likes: 46, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 732
    Location: NW Washington State USA

    Easy Rider Senior Member

    UM must be very inefficient. Obviously below hull speed and making a lot of fuss creating her big wake.

    Nice picture though.
     
  14. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,307
    Likes: 191, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    I should ad a note that Ursa Major is a Malahide Trawler, built in Dublin Ireland. A Romsdal trawler would be a boat built in the Romsdal district of Norway, a very different thing. The Romsdal is a more refined boat, almost delicate along side the just plain massive Malahides.
     

  15. Westfield 11
    Joined: Apr 2008
    Posts: 215
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 95
    Location: Los Angeles

    Westfield 11 Senior Member

    Good point Tad, it had completely slipped my mind that she was a Malahide. An Irish build IIRC and not Norwegian. I guess the similar look caused me confusion.

    Massive is a good word to describe her, I recall commenting on the 300# Navy style annchor: Captain Ron (really!) responded that "Ursa doesn't anchor, she moors!".
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. brendan gardam
    Replies:
    15
    Views:
    1,081
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.