Skin on teak boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by alan craig, Oct 16, 2018.

  1. alan craig
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    alan craig Senior Member

    I finished this two years ago but would like to show it off on boatdesign.net. Own design, rowing and electric outboard powered, skin on frame because I thought I could cope with that method, and nearly all teak woodwork because I brought home a load of teak benchtops when I retired from a university job. 14ft. long, 49" beam.
    Moderator might choose to move to boatbuilding if that seems more appropriate.
    If you click on the pictures you get a very short description.
     
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  2. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    Very pretty. I bet its light as a feather.
     
  3. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Teak is pretty, but also heavy. The choice of skin on frame is wise and the boat is beautiful.

    I'd like to know how it performs.
     
  4. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    By the way, teak is very hard to finish.

    What did you do with it? Is it encapsulated in epoxy? I have not tried that.
     
  5. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    Beautiful work
     
  6. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    The boat is a delight to look at. It obviously has some admirable quality craftsmanship.

    It is a bit of a puzzlement to have used teak for some of the structural elements and then completing it with SOF. Heavy weight timber combined with the lightest skin??? No doubt a fair compromise inasmuch as the teak was at little or no cost.
     
  7. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    The frame is thin stick so its total mass is... not much. So it minimizes the penalty of the material. The skin is the largest surface area and would ordinarily be the bulk of the mass of the hull, but he minimized that by using SOF. Quite clever.

    He could have used spruce or fir, but it wouldn't last much past the fabric skin, where as that teak frame will last for centuries.
     
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  8. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Still want to know how he finished the teak!
     
  9. alan craig
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    Location: s.e. england

    alan craig Senior Member

    Thanks for the interest. James... it was as light as a feather when I weighed the bare frame - 28kg/60lbs. Then I added teak floorboards, foredeck/seat and aft seat with folding backrest, and skin and paint. And a removable centre thwart.
    The teak stringers were much too stiff to bend around the frames in one piece in one piece so they were laminated in situ from two layers. The whole project was a bit of an experiment and I tried a gunnable adhesive and filled epoxy to glue the stringer layers together, and I tried screws, PVC tape and pound(dollar)shop clamps to hold the layers until the glue cured. It was an incredibly messy business and I recommend you just avoid using teak as stringers.
    I didn't really encapsulate the teak, most of it is just varnished. Messabout, the closer you get, the more the craftsmanship disappears! But I'm really happy with the shape. Oh yes, I had no problems with gluing teak with epoxy, except on a few scarfed rubrails when I didn't mix accurately.
    Fallguy, I thought it rowed and handled great but on a trip down the river Thames I seemed to be slower than everyone else but that could just be my lack of practice.
    Pics show it at first launch (Watercraft magazine article) and up a muddy creek in Cornwall.
     
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  10. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Alan the craftmanship is not to be subjected to microscopic scrutiny. It looks damned good to me. Salud!
     
  11. alan craig
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    alan craig Senior Member

    Excellent reply, Messabout!
     

  12. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    I remember you Alan, you're Four Candles!
     
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