Single inboard hulls that surf well - 24-27 ft range

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by fishingbill, Mar 2, 2021.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Interesting answer, it doesn't seem to apply to the "lesser" gamefish, which being a little further down the food chain, are not as bold in closely approaching boats towing lures/rigged baits, though Wahoo seem fairly unconcerned by boats. I used to let baits out as far as 70 or 80 metres on calm days, in the middle of the day, to get a strike, that you would not get at 40-50 metres.
     
  2. fishingbill
    Joined: Mar 2021
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    fishingbill Junior Member

    I don't know what lesser gamefish are. In my opinion all game fish are good and fun to catch. I fish for marlin, tuna, dorado offshore in SoCal. there are times we used to go 90 miles off the coast searching for albacore and tuna, others down the mexican coast 30 - 40 miles off the coast looking for the same species. It's very rare that wahoo come up the mexican coast to where I can get to them. They did show up a few years ago but I didn't have a boat back then. I have fished for wahoo off cabo san lucas. The mexican captains only fished for them in the very early am and trolled marlin lures to catch them. I have heard people on the east coast troll for them but at high speed (15 knots or maybe faster). At that speed all boats will create a huge turbulent wake. I have no experience fishing or trolling for wahoo. I'm glad we don't have to put a lure so far back in the spread. We count the wakes off the transom and put lures from 3 to 5 wakes back. We have so much boat traffic that we could not put lures 40-50 meters back let alone 70-80. I don't understand why the need to put them so far from the boat.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Different fish, different trolling depths, different baits, different trolling speeds, which can vary from place-t0-place for the same species. But if inboard it what it takes for billfish, then that's where you go.
     
  4. heyscientist
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    heyscientist New Member

    Not sure if you'll see this as it's an old thread, but can you elaborate on the relationship between tendency to broach and the distance between the CLR and COG?

    I feel like I understand what you are saying about the effect of the location of the CLR but not the distance between CLR and COG.

    My first boat was a 26 Blackman and I am considering restoring one that has termite damage as a project. Aside from the following sea behavior it was a great boat, very fishy. Part of the issue with the flybridge version of those is that there is a lot of glass up high in the bridge and they are very tippy. Which would be addressed in a rebuild. But also the CLR as you describe it is going to be fairly far forward due to the deep knifey bow and moderate deadrise at the stern. Most of them were built with volvo sterndrives so they can trim the bow up going downswell, but the original poster's boat was an inboard so that wasn't an option for him.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Hello, the longitudinal distance between the CLR and COG is what creates the lever arm that wants to steer the boat off course. Think of a throwing dart, where they put the weight forward and the CLR provided by the "flights" at the back so it runs straight. Something like a jack-knifing trailer truck where if the load on the trailer is well aft, and the slippery road does not resist sideways movement of the wheels, the rear will try and overtake the front. People sometimes think that shifting fixed weights aft in the boat will raise the bow and move the CLR aft, reducing broaching tendencies, but it also sends the COG further rearward, and the result may be disappointing. So there is a limit to what you can do to mitigate it. As you mention, trimming the drive leg can help to a degree, but whenever there is a substantial separation of the CLR and COG, the potential is there. Is there any skeg at all on the centreline of this boat ?
     
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  6. heyscientist
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    heyscientist New Member

    Thanks that makes sense.

    No skeg or keel. Here are some pictures of the hull in question. 15 degrees of deadrise at the transom. The pictures don't show it well but there is a lot of bow flare.

    The other thing you get with this hull is occasionally it will lay over a little bit to the side when on plane. Not to an extreme angle but noticable.

    Despite these hull design issues these boats have a lot of nice qualities. Good layout for fishing. Soft ride in a head sea. Built heavy and solid but plane at a relatively low speed. Also as mentioned with the sharp bow and smaller chine and strakes they have a clean wake which is good for trolling.

    Blackman 26 Bow 1.jpg Blackman 26 Bow 2.jpg Blackman 26 Transom.JPG
     
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  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If it lays over a little at times, it is probably cross winds causing the boat to lay over into the breeze, which is a common enough thing. If the boat doesn't broach alarmingly, careful use of the trim might be enough to contain it.
     
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