Simulating Costa Concordia

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by APP, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. APP
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    APP Junior Member

    Hi,

    Has anyone tried to build up/simulate Costa Concordia using marine design software (e.g. Maxsurf, Freeship...etc)? It seems a large prismatic coefficient is coming out, for 51000 tonnes and that Draft.
    The data I have found so far is:

    Costa Concordia

    Tonnage: 114,500 GT
    Displacement: 51,387 tonnes
    Length: 290.20 m (952 ft 1 in)
    Beam: 35.50 m (116 ft 6 in), Breadth: 38 m ?
    Draught: 8.20 m (26 ft 11 in),
    {Draft maybe 9 m fully loaded, I read somewhere}
    Freeboard Height from waterline 52 or 61 m
    Maximum Speed: 23 knots Speed recorded (Max / Average): 16.9 / 15.6 knots
    Speed: service: 21.5 knots (39.8 km/h; 24.7 mph)
    Decks: 17 (13 for passengers)
    Number of Inside Rooms: 586 Number of Outside Rooms: 914
    Number of Restaurants: 5
    Installed power: 6 Wartsila diesel engines, 75,600 kilowatts (101,400 hp)
    maximum: 23 knots (43 km/h; 26 mph)
    Capacity: 3,700 passengers
    Crew: 1,100

    Once we have the ship, and found the LCG and VCG we could maybe run some software stability tests, for curiosity of course. Is that possible?
    To keep in mind also that she has/had certain stabilizers.

    Regards
    APP
     
  2. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    But how will you simulate what happened if you don't know what happened?

    -Tom
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    It may be that the heel is a result of the intentional grounding, since the hole is on the upper side.
    Then again, if the very long hull breach spanned an important bulkhead, it could have admitted enough water to give a free surface effect in excess of the vessel's stability and capsized her as she approached the beach and a safer upright grounding.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The part that will be difficult to simulate is the nut behind the wheel.
     
  5. quequen
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    quequen Senior Member

    In such a ship, you can't find the real VCG by modelling it. You need an IE, don't think it can be done, unless there is a sister ship somewhere.
    Agree with Bataan, heeling comes from grounding and, maybe, anchors. This is not just a stability issue.
     
  6. APP
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    APP Junior Member

    I think sister ships are (but not much data available):
    [Costa Concordia Length: 951 feet]

    Costa Serena 951 feet
    Costa Atlantica 960 feet
    Costa Pacifica 950 feet

    Regards
    APP
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The one that just sank is being re-named Costa Plenty.
     
  8. APP
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    APP Junior Member

    By the way, since you are in Australia, can you ask there if Concordia ship dimension could be built as a Catamaran? What would the % of additional hull costs? Normally the additional hull costs would be a relative small % of the overall cost (of approx. 400 M USD) and if such volume of cabins can be accomodated in a huge Catamaran as that. I think it could be possible and a safer ship could be a catamaran form for cruising or not?

    Regards
    APP
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I doubt it would make sense, even if it could be engineered, which is surely a monumental task. And how would it negotiate narrow channels into port ? Not to mention giving negligent captains two shots at holing the hull(s) !
     
  10. aranda1984
    Joined: Jan 2010
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    aranda1984 aranda1984

    A cruise ship catamaran

    Making a catamaran into a behemot like these... wouldn't it be even more dangerous in case of a hull breach?
    Can you imagine the torsional twisting loads on the bridge deck connecting the two hulls together on a 950' long cat?
    (That is 3 football fields, end to end!)

    ...I wonder, in our race to outdo each other, are these cruise ships an excercise in "what can we get away with"?
    ... Why don't we have another water slide and a second swimming pool on the top deck, maybe a water surfing platform also...

    Never mind,

    Stephen I. M.
     
  11. APP
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    APP Junior Member

    Right. Maybe a ... Trimaran! with slender Amas. One Ama breaks... the ship remains afloat. Too large for ports? Anyway people shall return to smaller size cruising ships and companies to more trained captains.

    Regards
    APP
     
  12. peterAustralia
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    peterAustralia Senior Member

    it has been done, though admittedly on a smaller scale

    http://uglyships.wordpress.com/2009/07/10/asean-lady/

    Cruiseships thesedays seem top heavy, though I am sure they are safe. Maybe it is because they are using light aluminium superstructure, where in the past they used steel? My thinking is that cruiseships are stable to moderate angles of heel, and then they go over. But being so big, I am sure it is hard to get them to tip. I think they use metacenter to determine stability, and that is governed by regulations

    I am sure the designers do a very very professional job, how many cruiseships capsize, about zero. Compare that to auto accidents, workplace accidents, they are very safe it seems to me. The ones that did capsize were those car ferries that got water down below decks, Estonia etc. As a cruise ship does not have a car deck and bow doors to let water in, I think they are very safe
     
  13. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    What about a trimaran with foils so the ship can lift up, heel, and fly an ama over the rocks?
    Are you there, Doug?
     
  14. APP
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    APP Junior Member

    I would easily embark in a Trimaran like this below. Seems very safe.

    APP
     

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  15. BPL
    Joined: Dec 2011
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    BPL Senior Member

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