Simpson Slipstream 15 - Opinions?

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Herman Miller, May 6, 2020.

  1. Herman Miller
    Joined: May 2020
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    Location: Washington

    Herman Miller New Member

    I have looked and looked and haven't been able to find much information on these cats and I foresee going and viewing one currently for sale in western Canada 1998 Custom Simpson Slipstream 15 Cruiser for sale - YachtWorld https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1998/custom-simpson-slipstream-15-3618291/

    Understandably a description and a handful of photos only goes so far but what is everyones opinion on this design and overall world cruising ability. I do know that it is glass over ply which I will definitely look at with scrutiny. Did the design originally call for a wheel in the salon?

    Any insight would be greatly appreciated as this is a lot of boat for the money and for a guy whoms wife forbade him from building a wharram in the garage this might be a great opportunity.
     
  2. catsketcher
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Australia

    catsketcher Senior Member

    Here is Australia Simpson cats have a good reputation as solid cruising boats. The Slipstream 15 was a racier version than the rest. One was raced successfully in the late 90s. One problem that I could see with the original Slipstreams was that they used to have a very slopey front window on the cabin. This version might have been built after this problem was known and has a much better vertical profile to the cabin front. This reduces interior heat build up.
    From the pictures it looks like a nice boat. I would have no worries about the design, Simpson has lots of boats in Australia and they are really solid cruising workhorses. The wing mast would give me some cause for consideration as I had one on a smaller boat and am not a fan but it is not a deal breaker for me.
    I would predict she would be a fast and solid cruiser with heaps of room - could be a really nice boat.
     
  3. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I do have one design concern.

    When a catamaran says sleek design, I have concerns about bridgedeck clearance and slamming.

    I have no data, but you want 5-6% LOA or for a 50 foot boat 30" to 36" of clearance to water.

    My boat is. Category B design and we have about 17" for a 32' LOA, which is a bit light at 4.4%.

    For a bluewater boat, you'll want to be closer to the 6% figure I'd say.

    I am only book smart here, but be careful of a low ship. She'll pound bad.
     
  4. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    waikikin Senior Member

    If it comes out good on a survey just negotiate, buy it and don't look back as you enjoy the boat and life it gives you.

    Jeff.
     
  5. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Another thing Herman...

    the boat is 22 years old and balsa core

    you will need to have the hull sounded or shot by a surveyor...

    balsa core boats are big trouble if the core gets wet...by 1998, things were being done better, but they make me nervous

    spending 250 on a 22 year old boat; you are gonna need to make damn sure to find any flaws becauseajor repairs will be very costly
     
  6. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    46F25916-D352-4130-9E2C-E4C401AA0D31.png I found a picture of the bdeck bottom..

    not a fan of no veed bdeck bottom

    This is a very wide boat for what appears to be low clearance as well.

    proceed with caution; I cannot find clearance numbers, nor can I find hydrostatics to determine how low she sinks under heavier cruising loads
     
  7. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Here is a link to a picture of a guy who admits his boat has horrid bdeck clearance for its width.

    We Moved Aboard a Catamaran | Sailing Blog - Technical Hints and Tips - Sailing Television https://distantshores.ca/boatblog_files/we-moved-aboard-a-catamaran.php

    other people recommend wider boats have ratios of higher bdeck clearance of about 1.3 inches per foot of beam; so for a 28' beam; that would be bdeck clearance of 36"; my pic looks less than that, but hard to tell

    less than that and no vee and she'll slam you to death in a head sea
     
  8. catsketcher
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Australia

    catsketcher Senior Member

    Be careful of all advice about boats we haven't seen or sailed on - even from me. Although I did spend a bit of time wandering around a Slipstream at a boatyard. Balsa core can be well done, but check where fittings are attached. Bridgedeck clearance on Simpsons is usually moderate to fine - on the Slipstream is seemed fine. As for flat bridgedecks, that is what most cats (including mine) have and I can't see a problem with it. At least not in the first 20 years of me owning a flat bridgdeck bottom.
    Here is a shot of a Simpson Ramtha. She has far less clearance than a Slipstream. She was abandoned when the rudders bent and the parachute anchor was lost in the terrible Queens Birthday Storm. She was later found, all fine even though she had no one to help her through a terrific storm, she was towed to Tonga or Fiji and the owners went and got her and sailed and lived on her again. They were very impressed with their Simpson design and made a point of emphasizing its sturdy design.
    Simpson designs are usually reasonably wide, so the hulls will have a reasonable immersion rate - she is not going to go down quickly as you put the shopping in.
     

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  9. catsketcher
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    catsketcher Senior Member

    Remembering that waves a wind always look way less threatening when photographed, I always quail a bit at this shot. There can't be many more intimidating cruising catamaran pictures. It looks incredibly terrifying and in real life it would have been many times worse. Great boat and great crew on the rescue ship the Monowai. Go to about 53 minutes in on this video to see the video - watch the whole thing if you feel the need to not go cruising to New Zealand.
     

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    brendan gardam and fallguy like this.
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