Should I angle the windows in or out?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Houseboat Man, Jan 8, 2013.

  1. Houseboat Man
    Joined: Jan 2013
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    Location: Australia

    Houseboat Man Junior Member

    I don't want to sound as silly as possible here, but here goes.

    I am building a big roomy cabin on our 18'6" glass boat.
    Pretty much as big as I can get it as we have four children, mum and dad and love being on the water.

    Question is the front windows, I like the idea of them angling outwards, but experience has taught me to value the input of others.

    Would love to hear anyone's views on the subject.

    Construction is 2"x1" framing, 1/4" ply covered with epoxy. Crown roof.

    Windows are workboat tug style rectangles, quite large ish.
     
  2. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Might mention the degree pitch you intend to tilt out from verticle. I'm guessing it's to manage spray on the windshield/windows. Are you using the roof for anything? Extreme pitch could be a problem in either direction.

    Will they open?

    I have some bullet proof windows from a bank, heavy and thick, I thought about using them if I built but decided the weight was too much, it woul be hard holding them in with light framing slapping the chop.

    Size and weight of the windows? :D
     
  3. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    verticle or reverse angle windows are easier to keep water tight and better resist UV sun burning the window bedding compound.
     
  4. Houseboat Man
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    Houseboat Man Junior Member

    The windows I envisage are perspex/acrylic and 26" high by 20" wide give or take.
    I was thinking the only reason angled outwards was more room in the cabin plus that wonderful domineering appearance of seriousness.
    The thought of spray hadn't crossed my mind except to promise myself i would fit at least one window washer.
    Removable windows are just great...on my houseboat/pontoon/raft I had only removeable windows due to cost and they worked very well, except for bugs, not really thinking too much about removeable windows on this one but the heat in Australia can be oppressive, I may have to hinge them probably at the base, but it just sounds so messy.
    I think I prefer solid fixed with a vent and side windows to open to catch the breeze. The side windows may have to open I think.

    Angled outwards from the top at 22.5 degrees is what I am thinking, at the moment.
     
  5. Village_Idiot
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Village_Idiot Senior Member

    I would go with vertical or angled out (reverse angle). I think that angled out looks cool, improves headroom, might improve downward visibility, and will probably shed water better.

    No good reason to angle in, like on a car. Cars do it for aerodynamics, but that is not a concern at the speed that 99.99% of boats are running, plus it collects frost much easier.
     
  6. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    SamSam Senior Member

    It kind of depends on what your boat looks like and if you care what it looks like when you're done. It might not look right on a ski boat.

    I have heard that in the night, with the windows angled out, lighted instruments on the dash don't reflect and obstruct your vision.
     
  7. midnitmike
    Joined: Apr 2012
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    midnitmike Senior Member

    I prefer the forward rack configuration for the sheer functionality of the design. They stay drier in light rain and spray conditions and give you that little extra space overhead for mounting radios, radars and depth sounders that normally hog up all the room around the console.

    MM
     
  8. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Its called a Portuguese bridge and it keeps rain off and sun.

    I think they are better.
     
  9. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    Reverse angled windows on a vessel that small may cause the cabin to visually overwhelm the boat. They will also cause the resulting longer cabin top to weigh even more. This concerns me on a boat that wasn't designed for a substantial cabin.
    Have you taken a hard look at canvas options?
     
  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Aft rake is the most common and aesthetically is most accepted. Arguments can be made for forward raked windscreens, but on an 18' boat, windage will be an issue and a forward rake will compound this problem.

    I also agree with Milehog in that weight will be a big issue on an 18 boat. Weight in the "eyes" of the boat will be detrimental to performance, so it must be well thought out. It's also important to try not to make an 18' into a 25'er, crammed down into a smaller size. It just doesn't work.

    Post some pictures and some sketches of your ideas.
     
  11. Houseboat Man
    Joined: Jan 2013
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    Houseboat Man Junior Member

    Here is the boat after I cut off the front "cabin" the "cabin" was designed purely as a stowage area and only to be used as shelter in case of emergency, it was built to take massive swells in a seaway as a rescue boat first then utilized as a fishing boat.
    I have cut out the minimum leaving a little extra where the new cabin will start.
     

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  12. Houseboat Man
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    Houseboat Man Junior Member

    Here is an idea of what I am doing
     

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  13. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Have you considered the stability implications, both the amount the CG will be raised and the effects of windage?
     
  14. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    On a small boat Stability is a consideration.

    Also consider your climate. Wheelhouses become ovens in sunny climates.

    Personally , on a small boat, I would design and build a forward windscreen to deflect spray and wind, then use a Bimini type top to provide shelter from the sun and rain
     

  15. Houseboat Man
    Joined: Jan 2013
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    Houseboat Man Junior Member

    Compromise is going to be stretched as far as I can stretch it with this one, maybe to lead in the keel, but hopefully not.
    Here is a picture again, I will keep the height to the minimum I can probably a bit less than the picture.
    Poorly performing boats are still my friend as long as they do actually function as boats, i.e. don't roll on their side and stay there etc.
    These hulls can take a massive amount of weight, my neighbour was telling me about a cray fisherman using one.
    I was thinking I will need to angle the sidewalls in a bit like 5 degrees and the front windows are at 15 degrees.
    The thing is this is the max length I can keep on a trailer at my house, maybe under by 18".
    As long as it isn't prone to capsize, that ok. If it's affected by wind I can live with that.
    I will try to make it as streamlined as possible.
    Canvas and bimini etc would be perfect but it has to be lockable, plus I love walls on boats and roofs and beds and toilets etc:)
    It will work, not as well as other designs I admit.
     

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