short boat wide beam?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by steelman, Feb 3, 2010.

  1. steelman
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    steelman Junior Member

    Hi all I am new here and I wold like your tc on a 31' boat with a 12' beam I here she pounds a bit. one more thing she has a 14deg dead-rise. Is this a bad combo?
    thanks
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It depends on many other things. For example, what is the entry like, displacement, speed, etc.
     
  3. wcnfl
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    wcnfl Junior Member

    Who made the boat?
     
  4. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

  5. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Sam Sam, With only the photo to go on, it looks like way more than 14 degrees at the bow of that boat. If Steelman's boat is really only a constant 14 degrees bow to stern, it is going to hit the waves pretty hard. For an offshore boat, 30x12 (actual waterline) is a kind of fat but is fairly common for inshore and lake boats.
     
  6. steelman
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    steelman Junior Member

    Hi
    thanks to all.
     
  7. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    A boat that has lower deadrise at the bow than the stern would be most unusual indeed.

    As TL suggested, if ther deadrise were constant throughout it would be likely to pound somewhat. More likely the deadrise at the transom is 14 degrees. Towards the bow it could be anywhere between 20 and 60. Generally, the trick with a boat like this is to learn to slow down a bit when conditions deteriorate to ensure that the deeper fwd sections remain in contact with the water
     
  8. Mat-C
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    Mat-C Senior Member

    Perhaps you'd post a pic of this vessel... as clearly I've misunderstood your description, perhaps he has too....
     
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  9. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Ah - I see you've edited the post, thank you....
    In the context of the thread, which is about a planing monohull, the idea of having a vessel with a higher deadrise at the transom than the bow, runs contrary to just about every design philosophy that I can think of.
    You have introduced the idea with a displacement hull, which is clearly different - though I still fail to see any benefits... perhaps your NA has come up with something new...? More likely you've been unclear with your description....
     
  10. Jeff
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    Jeff Moderator

    I edited the message - I think there was a simple miscommunication here, but I need to better enforce our rules in 2010: no personal attacks please. That has to go for everybody if I have a chance of keeping the newcomers inline.
     
  11. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Jeff, Where have you been? It's been scary around here lately.

    Of course, maybe we misunderstand what a square bow and square stern means. I did not understand it and maybe it has nothing to do with bottom deadrise. It's up to Submarine Tom to explain.
     
  12. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    I might add that my last post was actually one put by Mat-C, that I received by email. Since he must have deleted it, and it said exactly what I was going to say, I simply cut and paste it.
    Hope that's ok Mat-C....
     
  13. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Tom - yes I was wondering if he was talking about the bow . stern angle too...?

    Oh - and thanks Jeff....
     
  14. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    As for displacement hulls, I remember from when I was interested in canoes that in some racing class asymmetrical was allowed in that the widest beam measurement could be from the midpoint aft, but not forward of the midpoint. I got the impression having the bulge forward was faster. The description above, with a higher deadrise at the transom than the bow, reminds me of the shape of a Moby Dick whale, or many other fish. It seems to work for them, some of them being speedsters and some being long range cruisers.
     

  15. steelman
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    steelman Junior Member

    Hi all I am sorry I am new here and am not good at typing so I did not give the right info. By bad sorry.
    It is a mod V and ends in 14. Bow is much more.
    SamSam did a good thing with his post and The ?? has bin answered. It just seamed to be a short boat with a wide beam
    was wondering if this would be a bad combo.I was told by some it pounds bad it is a production boat and I feel good now thanks.To all for your hellp
     
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