Shop size and suggestions.

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by DC Landis, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. DC Landis
    Joined: Jan 2016
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    DC Landis Junior Member

    I have a nice connected garage that has worked for maintaining two 18 foot boats on trailers with 2' to 3' extended trailer tongues. All garage doors locked when the day was over. Moving the boats still did not prove to be easy. These two boats have been sold to begin a new project.

    My question, hopefully to those who have built boats in tight quarters, is this: is building a 20' double chined racing sailboat in such close quarters feasible? The boat will fit diagonally and the design will be downloaded to to templates. The potential problems I am facing are: moving the boat for better access to an area of the boat, putting boat on it's side and a complete inversion of the hull.

    Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated! Would love to get rolling on this bad boy, DC.
     
  2. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Welcome.

    You may have a chance if it is a 2 car garage. If it is smaller than that, you need to find another venue.
     
  3. DC Landis
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    DC Landis Junior Member

    Thanks, I'm hoping with much preplaning I will be able to make moves precisely and well within the space available, thanks much, DC.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The average 2 car will take an 18' straight in, though this is tight. A 20' boat is too tight, though if the building jig is on wheels, you can move it around as necessary. Putting it in at an angle will offer enough room, but also make odd shapes surrounding areas. Build a really stout rolling building jig. It needs to be stout, so it'll hold it's shape when moved around.
     
  5. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    I built my last boat on a rolling jig, but it was only just under 16 feet long. The garage was long enough to allow for it to be stored but was too tight to work inside. I rolled the jig out to work on the boat. Now I have a 26 feet long garage, large enough to store but still not long or wide enough to work on the boat inside the garage. See my http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/wooden-boat-building-restoration/skiff-51466-2.html thread post #23 and you will get an idea of the rolling jig I used.
     
  6. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    If your driveway is steep you will encounter difficulties. I never could have done that on some driveways I have seen.
     
  7. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You can take the boat out of the garage, roll it, and then put it back in. I have done that with boats up to 73'. Of course we used a crane. A 20' can be rolled by hand over tires; if you have a few friends to help.
     
  8. DC Landis
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    DC Landis Junior Member

    Thanks to all that replied. I do believe that situating the boat diagonally will provide adequate room. Once the hull can be put in a cradle, the swiveling castor idea for the cradle is a great one. I have a paved, flat driveway, so that is a plus. Walking directly into my garage to build, will offset some of the tight quarter minuses. Great input from multiple points of view, thanks. DC Landis
     
  9. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    One pair of casters should be non-swiveling so you will have more control when moving the jig.
     
  10. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I disagree, I've found all the casters should move, making it easy to shove one end, then the other. Also the lack of control keeps you honest.
     

  11. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    I would then suggest move be done by 2 persons to avoid banging sides of project into walls, etc.
     
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