Shipping a boat from overseas... (Shipping a wooden boat from Finland to Alaska)

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Spin_Drift, May 17, 2008.

  1. Spin_Drift
    Joined: Jul 2006
    Posts: 11
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    Location: Finland & Alaska

    Spin_Drift Sea Witch

    Sorry if I posted this in a wrong forum. I'm new here.:confused:

    Does anyone have ides on what is the best way to ship a 25-26 feet long 7.5 feet wide cabin cruiser from Finland to Alaska?

    I have contacted and prodded Victor Ek, a local company here in Finland and waited for answers since March. It seems they can't or are unwilling to help us.

    Can you recommend any reliable international shipping companies?

    Would be best to build a crate around the boat and block her and try to ship her that way?

    Or, -should we buy a boat trailer for it and ship her that way?


    Thanks for any help you can give us.

    [​IMG]

    Please, tell me where this post belongs and I'll be glad to move it, if it should be moved.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2008
  2. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Cape Town South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

    To my mind

    only one way = container (not cheap)

    too much work has already gone into this boat

    she is beautifull
     
  3. Spin_Drift
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Finland & Alaska

    Spin_Drift Sea Witch

    Thank you. :)

    I've looked at containers, but they are narrower than the boat.

    Do you or someone else know where can a wider container be gotten, if they are available?

    Does anyone have an idea how much shipping her might cost? Ball park figure!

    Victor Ek has not given us any info and we are getting ready to move back to Alaska this summer.
     
  4. safewalrus
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Cornwall, England

    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Most containers (you'd need a 40 footer) have internal dimensions of 7 feet 7 inches so theoretically with a lot of care you'd be able to ge your boat inside! Save on the packing a bit as well!!

    Failing that your best bet is to build a crate around the boat! Send her deck cargo, with that beam and the size of the crate you wouldn't be too far outside that of a container but still outside! So a lot of companies wouldn't be interested - they can only "think inside the box" (no pun intended), if you can't get a local one how about somebody from further afield? Which ever you choose unfortunately it rathe looks like it may be expensive!

    Don't forget when you do ship it make sure the boat is properly packed and covered - especially if going deck cargo! Whilst every care is taken once at sea it has to fend for itself, weather conditions may be pretty bad - salt spray and waves can do a hell of a lot of damage on their own!!
     
  5. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    One beautiful bit of work, insure her and look after her well.... (The boat - I'm married but I would marry the boat - that is still legal)
     
  6. kengrome
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Gulf Coast USA

    kengrome Senior Member

    Some container shippers claim inside widths of 7'8" but I find that 7'4" is a safe number to rely on. Your boat is 7'6" wide so it probably won't fit upright ... but how TALL is it? You can probably ship it on its side in a high-cube container if its height is less than 7'4".

    You might not have to tip it completely sideways either. Some boats with cabins narrower than the max. beam (such as yours) can fit in a container just by tilting them a little bit., maybe 10-15 degrees.

    A container will probably cost you $5000 for shipping, maybe more with the rising cost of fuel these days. Deck cargo will cost you at least twice as much as container shipping (maybe 3x as much) so check the dimensions carefully and see if you can get it inside a container before you consider deck cargo.
     
  7. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    I'm not sure if it would help, but you could get it from here to Vladivostok with train. From there don't know sure but maybe with some russian costal frighter up the coast to Kolyma region? and short :D cruise to Alaska..
     
  8. murdomack
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Glasgow

    murdomack New Member

    Try a palletwide container, these will fit in a ships container cell (8ft), and are the same footprint as a normal ISO container. Here are some dimensions.

    GESeaCo 40' Palletwide Container 9ft6 "SeaCell"
    Internal Measurements
    Length 12.03 m
    Width 2.35 m
    Door Width 2.34 m
    Height 2.69 m
    Height at doors 2.58 m
    Container weight: 3800 kg
    http://www.geseaco.com/GESeaCo/ContainerFleet/DryFreightBoxes/

    You can also get an inland container that is 8'-6" wide but it would not fit a cellular containership and would cost a premium to ship deep sea.

    Your other option if your 7.5 ft is accurate is to get an open top container or an ended flatrack. If the shipper could box the flatrack between other containers it would help to shelter your boat from the elements, or it could go in the hold cells.

    There is also an open sided container with sheets, that would be like the flatrack with a roof. I'm not certain if these are accepted deep sea or not.

    I would get an accurate beam measurement done and my choices would be a palletwide followed by an open-top if you can get the boat into either. If you are beaten by a couple of inches, then the flatrack might keep you within the cell guide measurements and save you a lot of extra money.

    I hope that you haven't underestimated the beam as you will be charged for at least an extra cell if your beam is over 8 ft
     
  9. Spin_Drift
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Finland & Alaska

    Spin_Drift Sea Witch

    I'd like to thank you all for getting back to me. :)

    I'm getting someone her to help me get the exact measurements of the boat, this weekend.

    Will get back when I know more. Thanks again...:D
     
  10. RHP
    Joined: Nov 2005
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    Location: Singapore

    RHP Senior Member

    I would go with the tilt suggestion in a normal 40' container simply because of the protection afforded by the container structure. You might have to make a tilt trailer/frame first, place the boat and then wheel the frame into the container rather than try and tilt whilst loading.

    Good luck and definitely keep us informed!
    Richard
     
  11. Spin_Drift
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Finland & Alaska

    Spin_Drift Sea Witch

    Has anyone ever transported a wooden boat in a tilted position? This one weighs a lot and I'm afraid that beind in a tilted position for a couple of months might do her some structual damage. :?: :eek:

    I can see that would be OK with a fiberglass or alumin boat...
     
  12. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Obviously it fit's in when tilted:) You need maybe a 150m 2''x4'' timber, chainsaw, spike gun, old car tires, cargo jacks and a couple of days to do the trick. You can give me a call if need a hand:D
     
  13. safewalrus
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Cornwall, England

    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    I'd still have my doubts - the keel is the stongest memeber for various reasons - a boat ain't designed to lie on it's side for any length of time! If it was it would be built different!!
     
  14. murdomack
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Glasgow

    murdomack New Member

    Have you measured the beam accurately yet? Do you really need to tilt her? You can get storm videos on Youtube of the weather that containerships cope with. They may be big but they still get bounced around.
     

  15. Spin_Drift
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Finland & Alaska

    Spin_Drift Sea Witch

    Should get someone to come here and measure her tomorrow.

    I am worried about tilting her for the long journey.

    Will keep you posted when I have the exact measurements.

    Thank you, SpinDrift


    Can you post a link to the above videos?
     
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