Ship dictionary terminology

Discussion in 'Projects & Proposals' started by sinmania, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Heiwa, thanks for your kind reply.
    As you can imagine, I just quote what I think necessary.
    I think everyone deserves respect and can go by boat.
    Apparently I understand what you say but do not understand what you mean and you do not say. I do not know if I explain well. I interpreted your words literally.
    Cheers
     
  2. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    At least we agree about the White House. :D
     
  3. Nate57
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    Nate57 Junior Member

    I take issue with your statement Heiwa that "Many things happen at sea but no ship sinks when it runs aground regardless of tide."
    When a vessel runs aground near high tide she may very well may settle on her side on the falling tide and downflood as it returns.
    The end result is a vessel underwater and on the bottom. I'd call that sunk.
    And that's on a level beach. Vessels grounding on a rock often fall off with the falling tide.
     
  4. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Nate57 - When a ship runs aground, its bottom touches the sea floor, the double bottom may be damaged/up flooded but due to the presence of sea floor the ship cannot sink. It rests on the ground.

    If the tide is rising, the ship may float off the ground and get going again. It has happened numerous times. I have inspected many ships that have grounded in such manner.

    If the tide is falling, the ship will just rest firmer on the ground. It will not sink. And it will not fall off anything. Drunk seamen may fall off their beds, though.

    In order to sink buoyancy must be lost in excess of the mass of the ship and there must be deep water below the ship.

    My list of definitions above was meant to assist landlubber journalists writing about the Costa Concordia incident 2012, which was not a grounding.

    Costa Concordia actually capsized, when she was floating. The deckhouse top crashed against the shallow water a little off shore and the floating ship had list 90°. The port, upper side was horizontal.

    After capsize the hull was down flooded and the ship started to sink on the sloping seafloor off the shore. As the seafloor was sloping, the ship slid down and away from shore after complete sinking and came to rest at 65° list with part hull, superstructure and deckhouse above water.

    Had the ship continued to slide, it would have fully disappeared under water.
     
  5. Nate57
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    Nate57 Junior Member

    I guess we're arguing semantics. Specifically the term "ship". I did not realize that what you meant by "no ship ever" was limited to double hulled, flat bottom cruise ships. I was meantime under the impression (from those silly landlubber journalists) that the Costa Concordia incident involved (what I've always called) a grounding. Semantics again, does a vessel that runs aground need to remain aground to qualify as a grounding?
     
  6. The Loftsman
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    The Loftsman The Loftsman

    Shipbuilding Terms

    Not looked through them all but this is more Nautical terms as apposed to Shipbuilding Terms, i.e. Garboard Strake being the first strake of plating adjacent to the keel plate or keel bar. Stealer plate, Oxter plate etc, etc.

    Cheers
    Reckon this is or would be a worthwhile project aimed at shipbuilding or shipbuilders.


     
  7. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Having thought it over, I now completely agree with you.
     
  8. The Loftsman
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    The Loftsman The Loftsman

    So when do we start

    I have seen some lists of terms and indeed have some not so well known and very politically un-correct (Just the way it was building ships in them days-which were not that long ago)ones on my own website, but have never had the time to do a complete or as good as set of Shipbuilding terms, but perhaps over a length of time we could along with any other shipbuilders compile a pretty comprehensive list.

    Cheers
    Remember "Knowledge not passed on is Lost"

     
  9. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Totally agree Hoyte! The optimum hull for a hotel is a multi-storey basement with earthquake-resistant construction that includes a subway station, a heated parking garage and a drive-through car wash - complementary to guests of course. I like to think of myself as a well-grounded person . . . besides, there's something vaguely peculiar about a ship that brings you back to the same place it left from.
     

  10. sinmania
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    sinmania Junior Member

    Hey guys here is a blog with useful free resources about marine engineering and design http://navalscience.wordpress.com/ Join, share and collaborate. I will try to sort them C&C welcome..
     
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