Ship build

Discussion in 'Materials' started by danlaw84, Nov 27, 2014.

  1. danlaw84
    Joined: Nov 2014
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    Location: Wirral

    danlaw84 New Member

    Ok so this is my first thread so hello to all my name is Dan and I've been in the navy for 7 years now and I am a marine engineer. I have a few questions about building a ship. If you were going to build an old wooden navy frigate in the cheapest way possible for example it would never have to be sea worthy just for sheer aesthetic purposes and the quickness of build it would just have to float and look pretty. what materials could be utilised to cut down the cost and time of the build. I've been told that to build a seaworthy vessel you are looking at £10k a metre.

    Dan
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It depends on many factors. For example, is this a vessel built to a class? That is, will it be shoreside attraction? If you are quoting that price for the hull and deck, it may be possible for a dockside vessel. The rigging is a lot more than that. Also, the amount of brass (polished) will cost a lot too. All the patterns will have to be made for each part. The cannon will also have to be cast. You are talking of a 160 feet vessel. The cheap construction also means it will be rotting apart within a decade.
     
  3. danlaw84
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    danlaw84 New Member

    Hi gonzo, many valid points this spans from a conversation me and some of the other lads where having. I've worked on HMS victory for a while and there wasn't that much brass on there to be honest and 90% of the cannon on there are fake. We where going on the assumption that if we had a 50m (160ft) ship to build from scratch could you if you where to use a cheaper substitute for ribs and maybe not for the outside clad reduce cost of the overall build as the ribs are for the rigidity and strength at sea could you get away with using something cheaper? Is there anything that could be used? Plus because of the health and safety monster would you have to increase the hight of deck head level? With modern manufacturing techniques now could you go down the route of the massive 3D printing and build a hull in sections and clad the outside? We where just posing questions really. But we where just talking about a dockside attraction really much like the victory just not built to the same standards of course lol.
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The cheapest and faster build is a steel frame with wood planking. However, cheap means a short life and lots of maintenance. It will cost more in the long run. Also, insurance companies may run in panic from it.
     
  5. danlaw84
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    Location: Wirral

    danlaw84 New Member

    Has the metal frame idea been done? I'm wondering about the maintenance why if it was done properly would it be such a problem? If a frame was built say from galvanised steel then that was boarded with ply and then sealed then dress the hull with old timbers that could also be treated. As long as there is no water ingress and it was done properly could this not be a viable option. A kind of movie set way of doing things but cheap and effective.
     

  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Composite wooden/steel builds have been done (many of the clippers, several Americas Cup contenders, etc.) and there's always issues with the dissimilar materials. There's also water, so you're better off with relatively inert materials, so you can mitigate some of the maintenance costs.

    The logical route would be a single skin 'glass or alloy hull, skinned with wood in the above water areas, so you have the look you want, but a watertight below LWL assembly. Since it would be a static display, you don't need a hull proper, so much as a very stable likely barge type of deal, above which an old looking frigate lives.

    This is a fairly easy project for a designer or NA with some experience and you should contact one of the many in your area. Most will not want to touch this type of project, unless you can show a serious supporter/contributor/sponsor coordination and appropriate budget.

    The basic problems with this type of project are the necessary requirements for a waterside display, which are considerably more than just a boat. For example, you'll likely need handicap access, his and her restrooms, headroom not in keeping with the reality of 18 - 19th century warships, huge electrical, plumbing and environmental concerns, including HVAC, dehumidifiers, railings and stairways to codes in direct conflict with the desired look of a frigate, etc., etc., etc. Sorting through this type of project requires professional management and design, plus some political expertise and friends in the industry that can pull strings when necessary.

    Simply put, it's more then building a boat like thing, but a project that encompasses, zoning, regional, state and local ordinance compliance and inspections, maritime and public concern compliance as well as possible social impact hoops to jump through. Sometimes, the idea sounds great, but the details kill it or worse, you get through most of the details and the public just doesn't want it at "their" local dock, in spite of them previously saying the idea sounded great.

    Lastly there's nothing about a project like this that is fast, nor cheap. Hell, you have to get politicians involved, which is a guarantee that it'll take twice as long and cost 3 times as much. So, before attempting to bite the head off a snake, think about what the inside of the snake might taste like, after you have. In other words, be careful what you wish for . . .
     
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