shell plating

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by EMKAY, Mar 3, 2014.

  1. EMKAY
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    EMKAY Junior Member

    what is the difference between a gunwale and sheer strake?
    TY for putting attention to the question
     
  2. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

  3. EMKAY
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    EMKAY Junior Member

    Ty "philsweet"
     
  4. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    It shows what a subjective set of terms they can be.

    Check out the definition of Gunnel on a "Lifeboat" versus a "Steel Boat" versus an "alloy boat".
     
  5. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    What does shell plating have to do with it?
     
  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Check out Number 13, the Gunnel

    The steel Gunnel (13) is the Capping Gunnel (12) on the wooden boat.

    "Originally the gunwale was the "gun ridge" on a sailing warship. This represented the strengthening wale or structural band added to the design of the ship, at and above the level of a gun deck. It was designed to accommodate the stresses imposed by the use of artillery.

    In wooden boats, the gunwale remained, mounted inboard of the sheer strake, regardless of the use of gunnery. In modern boats, it is the top edge of the side where there is usually some form of stiffening.

    On a narrowboat or canal boat, the gunwale is synonymous with the side deck - a narrow ledge running the full length of the sides of the boat allowing a person to (cautiously) walk along the side of the cabin, generally with the aid of a handrail mounted on the roof.

    "

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunnel_(ship_element)
     
  7. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    So a sheer strake is the top strake of a hull skin/shell and a gunnel strengthens it. ?
     

  8. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    That makes sense. The point I was attempting to make is that the terms can be a bit 'bent' depending on the types of hull. Like all 'technical terms', some may need to be clarified on individual hulls.
     
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