Shell expansion book reference?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by ldigas, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. ldigas
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    ldigas Senior Member

    Anyone know of a good book that deals with shell expansion determining and drawing?

    I'm interested once one has a lines plan worked out, how does one determine and draw
    the shell expansion drawing. The maximum allowed dimension of the plates used in the
    yard is known at that time.
     
  2. Olav
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    Olav arch. nav.

    Not a book as such, but maybe you can gain some useful information from the PDF attached.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. ldigas
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    ldigas Senior Member

    Olav,

    thank you for the PDF. Although it did not answer any of my questions, it is a valuable read, and gave me some intro into the matter.

    What I am looking for, specifically, are practical methods of how shell is developed on steel boats in the range 20-40m (if that matters). I have several more popular books on boatbuilding (Gerr, Goodwin) but not much info on that particular topic.
     
  4. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Please define "developed". As this shall dictate a correct response that you are after.
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I think he's looking for a guide to expanded panel shapes.
     
  6. ldigas
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    ldigas Senior Member

    You're probably right. The difference between developed and expanded when translated from english to croatian is a little blurry.
     
  7. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Then i suggest you start with something like:

    "The Geometry of Sheet Metal Work", by A. Dickason published by Pitman.
     
  8. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A torch in a skilled hand can make sheet steel do back flips with a half twist. I think this is a case where some one is looking information about something, they have zero experience with, both from an engineering stand point (physics, simple geometry and material properties) and a practical level. It's one thing to read about rolling a plate and another to see an uncooperative edge, aligned by a well skilled welder and his torch.
     
  10. daiquiri
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    True, PAR. But he is seeking info because he wants to learn. Perhaps he doesn't have a good artisan nearby to show him tricks with gas torch.
    Besides that, I don't think there is a reliable and handy mathematical model for permanent heat deformations, to be used in the design phase (you guys correct me if I'm wrong). It is still left to personal skills and experience of the torch-welder. If he doesn't have the necessary experience then it is better for the safety (possible high residual stress of uncorrectly bent and costrained plates) and quality of the final product to stick with the single-curvature developable plates. The former also require less time to manufacture and hence allow to keep the costs under control.
    Cheers
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I want to be a dentist, is there any books to help me learn about root canals?
     
  12. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Sorry PAR, if I understood your point correctly I have to disagree with you this time. :)
    There was surely a time when you didn't know all the excellent stuff you do know now. At some point you have started to learn, though. One can learn from books, in the schools, from an experienced craftsmen or sailor, or (often a painful way) from personal experience. Most of times a single source is not enough because no single person or institution is a guardian of all the knowledge. But there is always a starting point in everything we do. The OP is asking for a good (which I read as - verified, reliable) book, which I consider a positive and constructive way to start a learning journey. ;)
    Cheers
     

  13. ldigas
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    ldigas Senior Member

    daquiri, Ad Hoc, thank you for the provided materials. I found
    Dickason's book on some "second-hand book site", ordered it for a few
    dollars, and am now waiting for it to arrive ... Have questions, hoping
    it will answer some ...

    As to the discussion between PAR and daquiri, let me just explain a bit.
    I don't know was it a guess, or his familiarity with this little part of
    the world, but daquiri explained it pretty correctly.

    I'm a relatively young nav. arch., from an inland town, where I studied. Although Croatia has its share of yards and even one college in
    a sea town, those of us who after college didn't start working in
    shipyards are sometimes left behind on some aspects which are usually
    learned by watching and learning from master workshop workers, and technologists. This can be said to be such a case. Unfortunatelly, good books on the subject
    are rare (as books on most shipbuilding subjects are, for that matter)
    and if one doesn't start within a yard, then he has to learn the painful
    way.

    So, doing my best here ... collecting every piece of info I can from
    people ready to help and explain ... (yeah, that's you :) and going from there ...
     
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