Sharpie; Opinions, please...

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by srt9969, May 15, 2009.

  1. srt9969
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Glasgow, UK

    srt9969 New Member

    Hi all,
    I'm new here, but have lurked for a while.
    I wasn't sure which category to put this in, but it's about design, so I stuck it here...
    I'm about to start building a Glen-L 'Fancy Free', and am wondering what the general opinion on the Sharpie configuration is. Born & bred in the UK, I twitch if it don't have a long keel, but I read that Sharpies are pretty stable if looked after. Can anyone shed a bit more light for me? Is there stuff peculiar to sharpies that I should know? (I've read the Sharpie Handbook, but still feel like I know nuffin...)

    Thanks,

    Sean
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Sharpies are now a common word used to describe many different types of boat, most aren't actually sharpies. Fancy Free isn't a sharpie, though it has some styling clues from them. As far as she goes, she's much stiffer then a real sharpie which would have as much as half the beam of Fancy Free. A fat sharpie on Fancy Free's length would be 5' in beam not nearly 8'.

    This boat has good light air performance, very shoal draft and good behavior, considering what she is. You don't need a keel, the centerboard will provide something to pivot on when necessary.

    She's a plywood on frame build, mostly because of the age of the design, but she's still fairly light for her era. She would benefit considerably from a conversion to taped seam construction. This would eliminate most if not all of her frames and many other pieces, decreasing the amount of lumber you need and stuff you have to make and install. The results of a change like this would make a more water tight and stiff boat.

    If it was me, I'd cut the cabin length down a bit to give more cockpit space, while still offering sitting and sleeping accommodations below. Lets face it, you'll be sailing it a lot more then sleeping in it. The decrease in weight and windage would be beneficial too.

    I say go for it, she's a well established boat with good manners.
     
  3. srt9969
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Glasgow, UK

    srt9969 New Member

    Thank you for your response; I take your point that the design is too wide in the beam to be a 'real' sharpie. I'm also reassured by your comments on behaviour.
    Regarding conversion to taped seam; if this will lighten the build, will I not then be adding ballast in order to bring her to her lines? This is largely academic: I have no idea how to go about making the conversion anyway...
    I also take your point regarding cockpit size, and will look at extending it forward a little.

    Thanks,

    Sean
     
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