Self tacking jib

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Paul Scott, Jul 21, 2008.

  1. Paul Scott
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    Paul Scott Senior Member

    Has anyone tried attaching a self tacking track to their normal jib tracks? The the leverage of vertical legs from the longitudinal tracks up to the lateral track might be a bit too sporty, but what do I know?

    Paul :idea:

    thinking again......
     
  2. Omeron
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    Omeron Senior Member

    Hmm... sounds very interesting, if only i could understand what you are getting at!
     
  3. Paul Scott
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    Paul Scott Senior Member

    Well, after an afternoon of measuring, it won't work with the forward arc I want, but;

    assume two normal deck mounted parallel jib tracks on each side of the bow deck that extend a foot or so in front of the mast.

    Imagine a track (like a mainsheet traveller) connected to the jib lead cars that spans across the two tracks at 90 degrees to them. (Basically, a curved mainsheet traveller for the jib, that connects to the jib tracks, so I don't have to mess with punching holes through the deck, making backing plates, etc.. And I could take it off when I don't want it, or adjust the fore and aft movement of the thing, for sail shape etc..)

    Hope that helps.

    Paul
     
  4. mgpedersen
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    mgpedersen Junior Member

    Geez Paul, if you make your boat any easier to sail you'll have nothing to do :p

    So in the vein of actually helping, can you rig up some hi mod spectra strop for a "horse" ?

    Matt
     
  5. Omeron
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    Omeron Senior Member

    That definately helped a lot, and very interesting.
    The idea of getting rid of it quickly is a big plus.
    Simply clamping to an existing rail is a bigger plus still.
    Moving it back and forth has probably more entertainment value than anything else, as you would probably want it as back as possible to maximise foot length.
    If the span is too much, or the track is not hefty enough there might be too much strain on it as it is only supported by the ends.
    There may be too much torque at the clamped edge for the longitudinal rail's end screw.
    Can you not do without an arc? A straight rail would also help unloading the tension on the car, as it starts moving across during a tack as it shortens the distance between tack and the car.
     
  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    I was keen on something like that for my next project, untill I saw
    http://www.garryhoyt.com/id38.html

    This jib boom beats tracks and the rest of the gear look primitive.
    It also solves the downwind problem, as well as the tacking problem
     
  7. Omeron
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    Omeron Senior Member

    Yes, it does solve a lot of problems. But to me, it is the ugliest thing ever to be seen on a sailboat. And you cannot get rid of it from the foredeck when you are not sailing.
     
  8. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    yes, the looks are a bit of a head turner, but you cant argue with the performance gains, and getting rid of all that gear required to rig a jib car that doesnt even help the downwind problem, is such a bonus.
    I was under the impression that it was removable - but I could find any reference to it. If that is the case, I will be building mine, and making sure it *is* removable.
    maybe I can make it a bit easier on the eye as well.
     
  9. mgpedersen
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    mgpedersen Junior Member

  10. Omeron
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    Omeron Senior Member

    In my opinion, it is not easy to make it removable and less intruding.
    Since the jib sheet only controls the lateral swing of the boom,and there is no vang as there is on the mainsail boom, the bending moment at the root and compression along the pole are massive, thereby requiring substential bearings and a massive girth.
    Perhaps the stub of the pole may be permanently fixed and a section of the pole can be removed. But a short stub of a fixture protruding from the foredeck may be even more awkward to look at.
    I do not know if a vang would help downsizing the components, but would certainly complicate and crowd this already crowded area.
    Mind you, when not in use, it would make a perfect derrick to load and unload dinghys etc!!
     
  11. Butch .H
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    Butch .H Senior Member

    Is this what you are refering to

    Regards
    Butch
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Omeron
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    Omeron Senior Member

    Is that a boat?
    Is that hole, under, what seems to be a broken rail, is where the mast was once went through?
     
  13. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    At two o'clock in the morning, the vision of the baelstrom rig used by Proas and self tacking radio controlled yachts had a fight with roller reefing and voila -
    Attached is a possible solution to solving vanging tensions, with a removable boom, without putting a hole in the deck.

    Whadderyer think?

    Hmm. migh need a longer leading arm ...
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 30, 2008
  14. Butch .H
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    Butch .H Senior Member

    No Omeron it a ford fairlane gt the hole is where you droped your glasses. Of course it a boat those thingies are forward of the mast step and are used for the jibe
     

  15. Omeron
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    Omeron Senior Member

    Hmm....This thread is getting more and more interesting by the minute.
    rwatson, i like it a lot. It looks very elegant and definately miles ahead of the so called Hoyt Jib Boom.
    If you can come up with this at two o'clock in the morning, i wonder what you can do in a day.
    My only question is, how you think this overcomes the removability issue.
    Looks like in order to remove the boom, you have to take everything down, including the balancing stay and forestay. Or is it that the jib forestay is permanently attached to the sprit and you side step the boom and balancing stay to remove the boom?
    Do you think it can be done without the sprit?
    Do you think you can fly an assymetric off the end of the boom as well? Because if you can, you can also cant it to windward by lashing the boom to leeward. I think it is a genious idea.

    Dear Butch.H, Thanks for the clarifications. I was suspicious anyhow that that was not a hole for the mast but served another purpose. I just didnt realise that a designer would be considerate enough to put a hole ander a rail so that you can drop your glasses into, during a jibe, and leave so much gap between the mast and the rail, so you can put a deck chair in between and watch your boat sail from the foredeck. Also genious.
     
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