Seeking info on Tri-Star or Piver trimaran 23 to 27 Feet

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by LucD, Sep 25, 2009.

  1. jamez
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    jamez Senior Member

    The Searunner is a centre cockpit design built in sheet ply over stringers and frames, The CC26 has a rear cockpit and is built in CC as described previously. The attached page is from Derek Harveys book Multihulls for Cruising and Racing (a good read IMO). The frame and stringer example is a Searunner 25, the CC example is a CC26. If your library has Dave Gerrs book 'Pocket Cruisers for the backyard builder' it has a chapter on the CC26 and another 'low frills' Marples design the Seaclipper 28.

    R T Tavi certainly is a major achievment. The CC 26 and 30 are relatively simple by comparison. CC works if you can get cheap 3mm ply or veneer - you need lots of epoxy too. Then you can build all the panels in a small space. I was tempted because I had enough undercover space to build a mold and make panels and I think I could have got away with assembling it under a tarp in our summer. From memory you need 13 panels -so one a weekend over winter. In the end I went with something a little roomier and built a temporary extension to the shed.
     

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  2. LucD
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    LucD Junior Member

    He Jamez
    Nice boat collection
    Why did you pick the Cruz 25?
    Thank you for the pic. The second one about hull help's to better understand each principles. My library is very limited and before I buy any other book I want to make my mind on a boat model.
    So now I'm in my question and learning phase.
     
  3. DarthCluin
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    DarthCluin Senior Member

  4. jamez
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    jamez Senior Member

    Thanks lucD. I don't have them all now though. The skiff I sold last year, the Wharram is for sale now, but no takers. I don't have much money in it, but lots of sweat equity. I'll get another summer before selling it for zilch.

    I picked the NC 25 because it had everything I wanted (a couple of sit-up settee berths, reasonable headroom (1.7m), performance potential with a decent rig) and none of the stuff I didn't; like folding capability, an awkward interior, narrow foredeck, etc.etc. All with a material/construction method I understand. AND the designer lives across town - so no communication hassles. I'm enjoying the build but it is challenging at times, not through any idiosyncracy of the design, but just due to my own limitations. All boatbuilding is a lot of work.
     
  5. LucD
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    LucD Junior Member

  6. LucD
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    LucD Junior Member

    I was afraid that the TriStar would be a water hog because of his water line and wet are. I was wondering if a largely modified Buccaneer 24 would do the trick.
    I read on this forum that some member successfully modified their B24 to 28 feet and more. I have no idea what the inside look like.
    The CC26 does look nice and I read on some forum that some people forgot to lower the center board and they didn't notice the difference, Hummmmm.
     
  7. DarthCluin
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    DarthCluin Senior Member

    I don't remember an enlarged Buccaneer 24, however there is a Buccaneer 28. Getting plans could be a problem though. I hate to be vague, but I think someone in the Buccaneer 24 forums had a set. That's where I snagged these images. I recall that someone else was experimenting with a redesign to try to get more room in a 24, however I think TANSTAAFL (there ain't no such thing as a free lunch) applies.
     

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  8. catsketcher
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    catsketcher Senior Member

    Bucc 24s are very small inside

    If you think a Nugget is too small a Bucc is smaller.
     
  9. LucD
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    LucD Junior Member

    There's a modified b24 to 28 feet renamed Matilda http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/multihulls/22-24-trimaran-23449.html
    The guy successfully made many modification to it, 28 feet, dagger-board in ama and more.
    The nugget is too small in LOA and the hull if too fat if the B28 is anything like the B24, we are talking 20+ knots easy (with proper wind and sail).
    I saw some report, on this forum, of B24 doing 20 knots.
    The more cabin space you have the slower you go (depending on the hull).
    The longer the hull is themore stable in coppy sea.
    I really want to be moving in low wind. The B24 is probably too small. but properly modified, who knows.
     
  10. DarthCluin
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    DarthCluin Senior Member

    I am familiar with that posting, however I don't think he lengthened the cabin, he added a long raked transom and a bowsprit. Compare the side view in the photograph to the side view in the Buccaneer 24 drawings.
     

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  11. DarthCluin
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    DarthCluin Senior Member

    On his early trimarans Arthur Piver used centerboards. In his books he claimed that he rarely needed to use the centerboard. On the later Mariner, Nimble, and Stiletto plans he included drawings for small fixed fins to be placed on the amas instead of a centerboard in the main hull. I have no idea if that was effective. Most of the Nimbles that I have seen out of the water have a shallow fin keel similar to the Cross designs.
    In his book "Boats To Go" Tom Jones describes designing, building, and sailing his 28'-6" trimaran Hummingbird.
    "Without the daggerboard, she definitely made progress, tacking in 90 or 100 degrees or whatever you like. She made some visible leeway, but threw a nice wake, and gave a lively, interesting feeling... When we put down the daggerboard, the wake disappeared. It was caused by dragging the hulls sideways through the water. Speed appeared to be less, but believe me it wasn't. In a decent wind and seaway, Hummingbird will make good better than 4 knots to windward... In ghosting conditions, she will keep making progress toward her destination when boats with inadequate leeway prevention are going straight sideways."
    http://www.jonesboats.com/index.html
     
  12. LucD
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    LucD Junior Member

    DarthCluin
    You probably have a pretty good library.
    I think you misunderstood me. I definitely plan to have a keel, dagger-board or some sort of leeway prevention device on the boat I will built.
    I only mention it because it was mention in two different forum. I have nowhere near as much sailing experience as some claim to have here, but I do know my basic sailing.
    If you sail without a counter leeway device, you are likely wasting wind energy and augmenting your travel time.
    I heard the mention of Jones boat once or twice, but no info beside being heavy.
     
  13. LucD
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    LucD Junior Member

    DarthCluin
    You are saying that on Matilda, he only added L.O.A and no hull beam?
    I guess it's possible just to remove some of the choppy motion.
    I wonder what it really does to the design dynamic of the hull.
    I think he also mention moving the ama forward.
    In any case, these are big changes to a already built boat.
     
  14. DarthCluin
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    DarthCluin Senior Member

    LucD,
    Books are my bane. The problem with a good library is that shelf and room space is finite. When you want to add something, something else has to go. Then after you let it go you later discover you needed it. I could still kick myself for letting go of my copy of "Sailing The Farm".
    In the 22-24 trimaran forum Gary Baigent comments that the stern sections rocker was too sharp and the extended stern filled it in and faired it to reduce the stern wave and eliminate transom dragging. The downside to this modification is that you have to use a spade rudder instead of the kick up rudder. Shoal waters + spade rudder + inattention or just plain bad luck = having to learn to steer your boat by trimming the sails.
     

  15. bill broome
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    bill broome Senior Member

    don't listen to those catlovers. they are luring you into bigger boats, because, in 6-8m range, tris are better.

    they fold and go on a trailer quickly, with a big saving in mooring and maintenance cost. the accommodation space is in one human sized space. you can build the central hull and add-on a 5 1/2m beach cat at big saving in time. they may even sail better, certainly just as good.

    but which tri? build a 7m narrow dory, add deckhouse. won't have much resale value, no 'name', but it won't cost much either. if workmanship is good, you'll get your money back. besides, doing your own is worth a lot of money.
     
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