Seaworthy Rowing Shell?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Ganjiro, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. Ganjiro
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Ganjiro New Member

    Anyone know of a design they can recommend of a seaworthy rolling shell? I would like one with watertight compartments fore, and aft, and a shelf draining cockpit. I like the lines of the Wing Dory, and Yaquina River Guide Boat so something similar in lines would be nice with added compartments, and shelf bailing cockpit. Something lightweight with at least a length of 16 feet would be nice.
    I have been rowing dories most of my 51 years and they have a special place in my heart but due to 4 back surgeries, and lifting limitations I can no longer haul around my 125 pound dories to the beach so need something light yet seaworthy that I can take out into the bay on reasonable days to drag a line for fish while exercising. Your input is appreciated. ;)

    Wing Dory
    http://www.rowvirusboats.com/wingdory/index.html
    [​IMG]

    Yaquina River Guide Boat
    http://dory-man.blogspot.com/2010/12/building-rowing-shell_15.html
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Typhoon
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Typhoon Senior Member

  3. KJL38
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    KJL38 Junior Member

  4. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    From my experience, a racing scull can be very sea worthy but you have to know how to sea-keep effectively or they can be disastrous. They are the lightest rowing shell you'll find and plenty fast for the effort put in. They have water tight compartments fore and aft but if you take waves lengthwise, you'll split the boat in two.

    So, I would classify this style seaworthy but others would not, it really depends on your definition and how you operate the vessel.

    Cost may or may not be a factor for you, I don't know.

    I hope that's helpful.

    Good luck to you and your back.

    -Tom
     
  5. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

  6. Typhoon
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Typhoon Senior Member

    I dunno, I don't think too many people would classify a boat (shell) that would break in two when each end is supported on a wave as seaworthy....
    I also don't think they have sufficient buoyancy in the bow for any sort of safe downwind rowing, in fact, I could easily see them spearing down into a swell/sea and breaking in two.
     
  7. BrianPearson
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    BrianPearson Junior Member

    Angus Rowboats are about to issue plans for their 16' day rowing boat, called the Salamander. Their plans include full size plank templates which makes things much easier.

    http://www.angusrowboats.com/salamander.html[​IMG]

    The Expedition Boat is the most seaworthy. The Salamander will be lighter, as an open boat.

    Their new Cambridge Racer is designed for an attempt at the 24 hour human powered distance record. She's very light and would probably meet the "fast rowboat" thread very well.

    [​IMG]

    Very latest news about these designs and a new cruising rowboat here

    http://angusrowboats.com/blog/

    Brian
     
  8. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    See, I told you some would disagree.

    -Tom
     
  9. Typhoon
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Typhoon Senior Member

    I guess your penchant for rowing shells in rougher conditions explains your forum name:D

    Regards, Andrew.
     
  10. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    What penchant. You've entirely missed my point Andrew. If the OP really wants what they say they do, and they're willing to sea-keep accordingly, then they can have their desire. This thread is not about you or me, it's about the OP.

    Get it?

    -Tom
     
  11. NoEyeDeer
    Joined: Jun 2010
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    I suppose an obvious first question is how much weight can you deal with comfortably?
    Second question would be what is your definition of a reasonable day?

    I assume from your choice of pics that you want something you can sit in rather than sit on.
     
  12. Typhoon
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Typhoon Senior Member


    Wow, I guess you had your sense of humour surgically removed at birth....
    You still haven't explained how a rowing shell, designed for smooth, flat inland waters, and that will break in two without extremely careful navigation, is a great idea for less than perfect conditions...
    No boat that is at risk of breaking up at the slightest mistake, has any business being put voluntarily into those sea conditions. It's an extremely bad recommendation by you.

    Regards, Andrew.
     
  13. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    No Andrew, in fact, my friends regard me as one of the funniest people they know.

    I'm sorry you still don't get it though. You've set up some pretty hair-brained parameters there.

    Why are you so concerned with my input? It's not about you and me, remember?

    -Tom
     
  14. science abuse
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    science abuse Junior Member

    Ganjiro, I may have a simple solution for you. Scull a canoe. I've been doing this for years and have found my Bayou 160 to be very stable in rough conditions. To the point that I always go out when the weather is rough for the simple fun of flying the bow into the air and riding waves to shore. Occasionally I'll broach it when surfing, but c'mon, i'm really trying to screw up by that point!

    My "canoe" isn't much of a canoe, it's 16ft long, almost 4ft wide, and has about 16" of freeboard. It's huge for a canoe. I simply fit economy oarlocks to the gunwales with a sandwich of wood for einforcement and they've held up perfectly. it came with a center seat that i've been happy with so far:
    [​IMG]

    That said, my rig is well over 100lb, and though it now boasts a forward deck to keep the waves out, it lacks watertight compartments. What I've done to remedy that is add a latching/gasketed cooler to serve as my watertight storage (lashed securely in place, of course). If you're only going out for the day, this should be plenty.

    For your purposes, you could go to the extremes of getting a Kevlar canoe for $1500'ish and fitting oars as I did. My 4ft beam allowed me to use the gunwales for mounting the oar locks, meanng that I didn't have to construct riggers.

    For a lightweight canoe, you're going to have a foot narrower beam, so when making your center seat, you'll need to construct outriggers for your oarlocks as well. You could select a small plastic canoe and save some money while getting your weight under control. A sliding seat adds more complexity, though I've put 12 open water miles at a time on my stationary seat, and my butt felt fine.
     

  15. kerosene
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    kerosene Senior Member

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