Seaworthiness of Atkin Vixen design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Laphroaig, Aug 22, 2013.

  1. Laphroaig
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Laphroaig Junior Member

    Hello, could anyone help me defining the relative "seaworthiness" of the Atkin Vixen design. I have been reading C A Marchaj "Seaworthiness the forgoten factor" but find it difficult to apply to a narrow design type when differentiating between one hull or another.

    For example is the above design too narrow (opposed to the eric design or typical Collin archer type for example)? does it lack reserve bouyancy aft for a double ended design? Would it suffer from being pooped in following seas unnessarily? (not looking for a repeat of the double ended vs square transom debate, of which I have read many and learned relatively little) Does this design have sufficent dampening of roll in the hull form and ballast distribution for a comfortable offshore and coastal cruiser?

    In the context of looking for a suitable mid sized cruising yacht for both higher and lower latitudes.

    Thankyou for your comments.
     
  2. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    Vixen was designed by John Atkin in 1950 after 35 years of development of the Colin Archer type by both Atkin's, father Billy and his son John. John was the better designer though not as prolific as his father. The Vixen design was intended to "fix" a lot of the mistakes made in the earlier designs which started with Eric. John has written a lot about this and it's been published in John Leather's book, Colin Archer and the Seaworthy Double-Ender. Well worth getting if you are serious about the type.

    You mention "relative seaworthiness".....relative to what? If you compare Vixen to say the Contessa 32 that Tony uses in his book, Vixen will take you any place the Contessa will. But if it's to windward Vixen will get there far more slowly, and generally more comfortably.
     
  3. Waterwitch
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    Waterwitch Junior Member

    I know a couple who circumnavigated with their infant children in a Vixen. I asked him once if he was ever scared. The only time he felt uneasy with the boat he said, was when he waited too long before going up to the bow to take in a reef in the jib. So much for anecdotal evidence.
     
  4. Waterwitch
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    Waterwitch Junior Member

  5. Laphroaig
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    Laphroaig Junior Member

    Thanks, yes by relative I ment compared to other similar designs (full keeled double enders).

    From what I understand, it is a bit narrower than his previous designs which will give it a larger point of vanishing stability. (But gives it less initial stability and hence benefits from a lower aspect rig) It has moderate reserve bouncy in a slightly flared bow to make it less wet ( a reported issue with double enders like the west sail ). More reserve volume aft to make it less likely to be pooped by a following wave. It lacks a cut off fore foot but is unlikely to surf down waves and get "tripped" on it.

    It probably lacks sail area (or this is limited by its beam) and might be little sluggish in light airs.
     
  6. Laphroaig
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    Laphroaig Junior Member

    But should be very comfortable at anchor and at sea?
     
  7. Laphroaig
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    Laphroaig Junior Member

    Will try and source John Leathers book.
     

  8. Tanton
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Tanton Senior Member

    Vixen

    Like Tad said, a much improved older Atkin's Colin Archer type. Vixen is somewhat limited by the narrow beam, very heavy displacement and by the width of the garboard. Making her expensive to build in wood, but reasonable if build out of steel. Keep the design above water the same, modify the bottom and you 'll have a very good boat.
     

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