Seawind 24 Rig issues

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by VadimGo, Jul 22, 2016.

  1. VadimGo
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: USA

    VadimGo Junior Member

    Following up on my personal relationship with Cats.
    Last year I've made myself a composite (fiberglass tube, carbon fiber... I will post my experience on the Materials) Boom. As some of the more experienced members suggested, if it is not strong enough, it will break... So it broke right in the middle while on the mooring; I was away for 2 weeks, left it with both outhaul and mainsheet very tight, and compression force plus, probably, wave action...
    Since we are in a heat wave, and I'd rather be sailing... I've found a used alum. boom (from a keelboat) that a bit longer and quite strong and heavy. While fidddleling with the hardware I've decided to do it properly this time, and went with the parts from the boom and my mast fitting to a local boatyard (generally, known as a good quality, not cheap place). I wanted to have a track welded (it has crack) and a new tang fabricated, so a bigger gooseneck will fit.
    And the guy said "Nope". Can not do it. The gooseneck attachment on a track is too flimsy, it "will explode, and somebody will get hurt".
    So the question is,
    can I use the Seawind approach with a sliding on a track gooseneck?
    And if so, how could I repair the crack, as it seems not very likely to find a replacement?
    Thanks
     

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  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    That track certainly can be welded, though after grinding and smoothing, it'll be a little weaker than it was before the crack. If it was me, I'd see if Dwyer or someone had a replacement. Conversely, I'd also be inclined just to take it down to my magical welder/fabricator guy and let him look it over. I'd bet he tell me to weld up the clasp portion, to further reinforce the assembly. The way I see it is the only thing that needs to move is the keeper pin, so everything else can be welded down tight, making everything stronger. Of course it'll need lots of grinding afterward, so it'll slide okay, but this is normal and a good TIG man can lay a neat enough bead you'll be safe.
     
  3. Tom.151
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: New England, USA

    Tom.151 Senior Member

    Since I'm on the same wavelength as PAR I'll add a few thoughts.

    From the pics... that (cracked) part of the slider/car is rather lightly loaded for starters. Note that the load from the pivot pin is below that small cracked segment.

    Take it to your favorite stainless-qualified welder.

    If you're concerned about strength just add an additional "strap" welded over the end of the slider/car -- after you have the crack welded -- see attached

    Tom - ex SW24 #312 owner
     

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  4. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    Hi VadimGo,
    I'd be relatively unconcerned about that crack, a stitch in time is good to TIG it up though as above, I feel the guy you've spoken to is just being ultra conservative & not familiar with the boat, they are really just an overweight beach cat.... the best advice I ever saw/read about the 24 was "sail it like you stole it... don't fix anything until it breaks". that gooseneck car has been rattling away for 30 odd years & the bit that's doing most is still intact, the alu beam connectives are to watch though for cracking at the inboard bolts to forebeam especially as some were set up pretty crap with small washers- not sure about the US boats though. Mine is Aus built and original sail number was 36 so pretty old... definitely classic plastic!
    Jeff
     
  5. VadimGo
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: USA

    VadimGo Junior Member

    Thanks a lot Guys!
    Waikikin, it looks like my beam was welded already once. I've got the biggest washers I could find on them now and new nuts, and I will keep an eye on them.
     

  6. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    Welding of the beam is probably less than ideal at that point, beams can have weldments generally at the very ends but the application of weld at that inboard bolt is around the worst position for some background this current thread- http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/cl...elded-strength-aluminum-56243.html#post783392
    cat beams are generlly tempered material and that changes once welded/heat applied.
    On my Seawind 24 I have quite generous washers/external sleeve bedded over this area although this makes inspection awkward.
    Jeff
     
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