Searching for power cat plans

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by kenfyoozed, Sep 15, 2020.

  1. kenfyoozed
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    kenfyoozed Junior Member

    How would a design like the glen-l wildcat have to low of a tunnel and a lot of hull slap, that the Bateau Cat 22 would need the tunnel raised but a sled would be without issue?
     
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  2. DogCavalry
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    DogCavalry Senior Member

    Ken, I owe you a nice dinner. Not a red lobster meal, but nicer. I hadn't seen that one. Now I'm spellbound.
     
  3. kenfyoozed
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    kenfyoozed Junior Member

    Im in the class of boater that knows what their own boat will do. I have had my tritoon in 4' seas running at 25-30mph skipping across the tops of waves in a squall in Pensacola bay. V-hulls were sloshing and tossing about. Friends wife got off their hubby's deep v CCs to ride the smooth toon in the rough sea. BUT....BUT.... you have to know how to read water. I was raised white water rafting, kayaking and canoeing so reading troubled water comes natural to me. Reading the waves and knowing exactly when to throttle my boat back to keep from pearling, which waves to throttle over and even when its time to get the whole damn boat airborne. Crazy, that I am. You even have to know when its time to "PANAMA". My family doesn't like the white knuckle ride of my "FUN" boating. More research is needed but sea sled is gaining steam..... since it seems like it was designed for my style of boating but can be tame enough for the family.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2020
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  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Is it "Shoot the Messenger" Week ? :) The idea has its merits, as I say, relatively easily driven, and good load carrying ability, but the ride in rough water is not good enough. You can say the same about cathedral hulls. That's just the way it is, it isn't my fault, so don't blame me ! I thoroughly researched sea sleds many years ago, and it is obvious that is where the snag is with them, and explains why they never captured a market. Otherwise they would be seen all over.
     
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  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If you and "old mate" Ad Hoc can get the moderator to act against me in some way, then I will immediately and permanently vacate this website, so go for it ! I would simply describe you as a "vexatious complainant". :)
     
  6. Boat Design Net Moderator
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    Boat Design Net Moderator Moderator

    Maybe your posts in this thread would be better received if you gave more details of your research and experience, such as the wave conditions and type of conditions where you found it unacceptable. The first post says use would be "40% river, 40% bay and 20% gulf..."

    (If the OP finds this too off-topic, these posts could be split into a new thread.)
     
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  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I didn't introduce the subject of sea sleds into the thread, the OP did, and he said he didn't think they would handle the conditions he would encounter, which I only agree with, so I don't know what the fuss is about ! The opportunity to ride in a sled had eluded me, they are as scarce as hen's teeth, but I have been in various cathedral hulls, which are well known as an attempt to "civilize" the idea, and the nearer they are to a sled shape, the worse they ride. Some are just awful.
     
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  8. kenfyoozed
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    kenfyoozed Junior Member

    I believe the issue is while I stated I "think" they may not work, you clearly "know" they won't. Which the fact is you don't "know" either. You have a theory which is based on if they were any good there would be more examples of them on the market. While this could be true their are many items which were great, even ahead of their time that the market never supported..... Your statement that "cathedral hulls, which are well known as an attempt to "civilize" the idea, and the nearer they are to a sled shape, the worse they ride. Some are just awful." One could argue that cathedral hulls were awful to begin with because they were to far away from a true inverted v hull. The more they began to "civilize" they more they got closer to a tri-hull or even a v-hull. Then again you may be absolutely correct and everyone else is wrong. You have made your point. Thank you. Move on. Be better and just enjoy the hobby but be open to change. While I didn't think the sled would be a good fit for my conditions, the data that I have found with some of the sea trials has shown that it just may handle what I need. I researched for data, facts and evidence. I thought how this data worked for my application and decided I could have been wrong in my initial decision. I believe they call this the scientific method. I like to find a fit for me...... for example I like wrangler jeans, the market says I should wear levis. They have been around longer, but levis only last me about a year and I have some wranglers that are 10 years old. Different strokes for different folks.

    Ohh how about the new Mako 21 pro skiff AIV?

    (no need to split....Mr. E was just getting back on topic)
     
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  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I think you'll find most people, and all accelerometers, agree with my opinion, but I'll leave it at that.
     
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  10. kenfyoozed
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    kenfyoozed Junior Member

    Does anyone have any evidence, I would love if there were video, of how a sea sled would ride in 1-2' chop?
     
  11. kenfyoozed
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    kenfyoozed Junior Member

    I vaguely remember seeing a boat broad of aluminum boats that have an inverted v hull. I think the name was something like "route 33" boats but i can't find anything along that line now. I remember the videos had one painted like the ww2 p-40 shark mouth.
     
  12. kenfyoozed
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    kenfyoozed Junior Member

    I think I also remember a vintage set of plans but can find them now either.....
     
  13. kenfyoozed
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    kenfyoozed Junior Member

    I found a thread from a guy who built a modified sea sled. He lived across the bay so used it on my same local waters. He did mention that when the chop came up the boat would pound... if driven like you would a v hull. But giving it throttle and increasing the speed made the ride smooth. He said you could feel the cushion of air it was sitting on. He mentioned the stern did seem to wiggle a bit more but it was a dry and smooth ride. So it seems more and more like this boat is right for me....when in doubt gas it out!
     
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  14. DogCavalry
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    DogCavalry Senior Member

    All reet!
     

  15. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

    at the risk of getting abused like mr e . i too have something to add regarding powercats. here in aus years ago you would always see powercats at the boat ramp, they were the most popular design for offshore fishing but they seem to be out of favour these days, i know a lot of people have scared themselves in them at sea, some enough to sell their boat and some that have lost their boats, the culpret is usually a following sea on the quarter. the most popular offshore fishing rig now is a deep v mono with flooding keel or large reverse chines.
     
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