Seamanship

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Guillermo, Apr 11, 2007.

  1. charmc
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    charmc Senior Member

    Watch out Guillermo, Michael Jackson's lawyers will be after you for royalties!

    Whoops, maybe not. Last word was they won't do any more legal work without getting paid up front.
     
  2. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    No, no Charmc - Guillermo deals with little bouys...not boys...
    :p
     
  3. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Guillermo, how you know my early years were spent in Wales?? No don't answer it would upset the Welsh (there again).......
     
  4. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    OK mates, there's been enough for the fun. Any other interesting seamanship story to share?


    Here a most interesting thought:

    "Seamanship is, more than anything else, an art. It is not something that can be picked up and studied in one's spare time. Indeed, it allows one no time for anything else." (Thucydides, 5th Centuary BC)

    Cheers
     
  5. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

  6. longliner45
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    longliner45 Senior Member

    ok hows this sound ,imagine going offshore for 7 to 10 days in a 31ft boat ,,all provisions made ,but prepared for the worst.it is december ,the trips are shorter ,because of weather,you have marked all the cans of food because when it gets rough they will be rolling around the wheelhouse.the wind starts blowing from the west,that tells us its gonna get really rough, you have secured your toolboxes so noone gets knoked in the head ,,this is were all your seamanship comes into play ,you have lost one vhf radio because the antenna is busted ,,you have 2 ,,but your now wondering how long the other will hold out ,so far so good.seas are building to 12 ft maybe15.and you just snagged a shimp net in one of your outdrives,,being capton ,you take the job of clearing the net yourself ,after all its your resonsibility ,for crew saftey and all.about now you get it cleared ,your wet cold ,and will eat anything you find ,cooked or not ,you cant sleep or relax,now you have lost your no .1 loran,one radioand the outdrive leg is taking water because the shimpnet has chewed your seals.west wind always blows for at least 3 days,,your really tired .the sea lays down ,..most who are smart would go home ,you not only have your family to feed ,but 3 others as well, ,you repair the seal in the outdrive ,,pick up your fishing gear off deck,,and go to workfor 4 or 5 more days ,,seamanship is being prepard,seamanship is stamina ,and seamanship is being able to improvise,and persavier,,,,seamanship makes us alive with life.......longliner
     
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  7. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member


    Tell us Longliner - did Noone recover from the knoke on the head....:D
     
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  8. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Ah Bergalia I see you have lost noone of language skills when you moved to those there foreign parts! You speaka the septic very well!:D
     
  9. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    And Guillermo, that me handsom, be the American Manual (as opposed to the Spanish Manule who nothing but an ordinary seaman - sorry poor joke) and it be different to real Seamanship (the British version) or am I, as usual biased?

    In the first instance I note the marking of the hand lead to be slightly different - 13 fathoms being marked by three strips of leather, the British version being marked by a piece of blue serge (the cloth was a different kind for each colour to enable it to be felt in the dark - useful if you were 'sneaking' into soundings at night and either you needed to keep your lights out, or get shot at, or it was windy and thus awkward to keep the lanthorn alight (the secrets of a properly trimmed wick are all but gone!!)
     
  10. longliner45
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    longliner45 Senior Member

    noone was fine,it was his 2 brothers I had to keep an eye on ,,,dammit and notnow.longliner
     

  11. rayk
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    rayk Senior Member

    Instalment one....

    The heights of seamanship.
    :rolleyes:
    Stay tuned...
     
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