sea-worthy amphibious craft?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by jkittel, Sep 26, 2007.

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  1. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

  2. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Ah yes - but is it MARINISED - and will it SAIL ??? :)
    The pole idea has potential, and has appeared on other discussions as well.
    The transition from sea to land will be solved commercially for affordable prices one day - but will I live to see it ?
    There must be some rich inventor out there ....
     
  3. SamM1234
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    SamM1234 Junior Member

    Well, I think a pole is marinized since it's just a piece of metal/other material with no moving parts. Perhaps, they can be hydraulically actuated similar to the ones on the vehicle above. Then, we need to see how much space and weight they take inside the hull to determine the performance/accommodations penalty. Was there a discussion about this in detail, can you send a link?
     
  4. rambat
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    rambat Member at large

    Jack up

    "Well, I think a pole is marinized since it's just a piece of metal/other material with no moving parts. Perhaps, they can be hydraulically actuated similar to the ones on the vehicle above. Then, we need to see how much space and weight they take inside the hull to determine the performance/accommodations penalty. Was there a discussion about this in detail, can you send a link?"

    I think you are describing a Jack-up vessel, we have hundreds of them operating in the wetlands and shallow coastal waters here in the Gulf.
     

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  5. creosote
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    creosote Junior Member

    I'm posting to this thread because I think I found the boat I was looking for in a new thread.

    Why not fix a low profile motorcycle tire to the prop of an electric pod like Azipod? The pod can already "steer" and is a marinized electric motor, it just needs a spring/shock absorber.

    If that doesn't work, replace the prop with a pulley and drive the wheels with a belt or plastic chain.
     
  6. creosote
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    creosote Junior Member

    Too cool for reality, or is it?

    Rwatson as writing about this...


     
  7. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

  8. irv
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    irv Junior Member

    Kach221, Yes the navy has built some very experimental stuff. I work at PSNS and some of its still here. Some have been sent to dremo and bought for pennys on the thousand. Just a while ago, a guy bought a experimental boat built by Boeing that was just sitting behine the industrial area for 30 some years or more. Not sure how to access it but the military does have a web site that offers all their back yard clutter thats no longer classified. You might not find what you want, but some of the parts can be had for sure.
     
  9. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

    Would you by chance have a link or a few key words I could Google?

    I was looking for the cooling fans on an armored vehicle a while back and could find nothing at the so-called surplus sites.
     
  10. creosote
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    creosote Junior Member

    Another kind of wheel

    The road wheels that we are used to have many problems in the sea. How about a different kind of wheel? Rolligon.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXcuinvxsoY

    Tundra and deep snow.

    From http://albeerolligon.com/history.htm

    On the day the Rolligon idea was born, Bill was returning with a group of Eskimo hunters from highly successful walrus hunt. Cut off from their village and usual landing place by an ice-floe, they were forced to beach their heavily loaded sealskin boat on a steep, rocky beach. The boat, filled with five tons of the Eskimos’ winter meat supply, was in danger of being cut on the sharp beach rock. However primitive ingenuity prevailed. On the spot, the stone-age hunters blew up several tightly-sewn sealskins, converting them into crude pneumatic rollers. On these pillow-like bags they were able to pull the heavy craft over the sharp rocks and steep gravel bank to safety

    A low pressure tube...:idea: RIB sponsons.

    Make a trimaran with rolligon styled sponsons for the outriggers. Rotate and roll on them up the beach.
     
  11. creosote
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    creosote Junior Member

    Crab

    If the point is just to get on the beach, keep the rolligon outriggers in position and roll sideways onto the beach, like a crab. If the rolligons were less bouyant, you have a SWATH.

    If you're okay with spinning outriggers.

    http://gsl.erdc.usace.army.mil/gl-history/images/gl_img_93.jpg

    Floating Archimedean Screws that propel the vehicle in water and drag it onto shore.

    The toy company Tyco built one:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yIkxN-2BLM
    (It hits the water at 2:15)

    Note that the US Army's review and the youtube video show that this concept doesn't work well on hard surfaces.
     
  12. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Its interesting that this topic has resurrected itself about the time I was inspired by a recent event to rethink the amphibious yacht. I had taken my 'non sailing' partner down to a yacht club, to get some experience with 'off the beach' dinghy sailing. She took it all in good spirits, getting wet and cold during the launch, wet an cold during the mandatory capsize practice, and cold and tired hauling the dinghy on its trailer up the beach to the club house.

    Unfortunately, a couple of other attendees were quite put off the idea from this experience. I was reminded of those two person, heavily ballasted dinghys used for handicapped sailors that dont capsize. ( see Access Dinghys
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBA-zFJ3M94 )

    If we made the ballast from batteries, could we use the power to have them propel themselves down the beach and into the water, and then back onto the beach after a sail ? maybe along the lines of
    http://www.sealegs.com/

    Us oldies like the concept of sailing without suffering.
     
  13. creosote
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    creosote Junior Member

    Their biggest Sea Legs can carry itself and 700 kg of a payload onto the beach. How much does a sailboat weigh?:confused:
     
  14. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    or how long is a piece of string - a sailboat can weigh 300 kilos to 3 tonne - its just a matter of beefing up the landing gear.

    The Access dinghies I was talking about are only about 300 kilos inclusing the ballast, so I am not sure why you are confused.
     

  15. creosote
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    creosote Junior Member

    Because I got wrapped up in the idea of big power cats and monohulls with ballast.
    As I looked at the sea legs website, I saw a lot of boats parked on the sand. So as the weight goes past 700 kg, it's going to need more wheel area to keep from sinking in the sand. With more wheel "floatation" it would be a shame if it just became ballast when in boat mode.

    "Waste not, want not."
     
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