sea-worthy amphibious craft?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by jkittel, Sep 26, 2007.

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  1. captaintrue
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    captaintrue Junior Member

    Ah yes I suppose its similar in conention. Good call.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sAH8xL2W30

    As for what would make a craft seaworthy tends to touch upon of structural integrity, ballasting, keel (retractable or otherwise). IMHO a sea anchor is a must.
     
  2. rambat
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    rambat Member at large

    Mud wheels

    Big wheels with track like segments seen it before and it looks workable, maybe even for water propulsion, see attached
     

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  3. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    The heading on the thread is
    "Sea Worthy Amphibious Yacht"
    Not much sail on some of these examples.
    I think I have outlined my priorities elsewhere, but my preferences are for sail (for economy and safety in case of engine failure), and the ability to get up on a beach out of heavy swells.
    Nothing quite so silly as leaving the yacht swinging on the end of a bit of rope while you negotiate the waves in a tiny inflatable. Thats why the marina's make such a lot of money - but who wants to explore remote marina's!
    A lot of old sea captains negotiated their way around the world, only to be drowned while being transferred to shore in the longboat.

    Rambat - I put up a similar concept (Big Wheels) about half a dozen posts ago - (old metal tractor wheels), but the room they take up, weight and transmission design , and hydrodynamics killed the enthusiam.
    As a result, some other lightweight , hull protecting, low maintenance methods would win it for me.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2008
  4. tspeer
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    tspeer Senior Member

    Derek Kelsall has a design for an amphibious catamaran. Wheels are mounted in the topsides of the hulls:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The hulls fold under the bridge deck:
    [​IMG]

    On the water, the wheels act as built-in fenders. On land, the boat can be trailered on the wheels. I don't see any reason why the wheels couldn't be powered, or why the design couldn't be scaled up. The beams could be hydraulically actuated.

    Note how the beams are used to lever the hulls into place, and a cross-member added to lock them in place:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Given the seaworthiness of the catamaran hull form, I think this meets your criteria of a seaworthy amphibious vehicle.
     
  5. Kay9
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    Kay9 1600T Master

    Wow and the tires act as built in fenders....Ingenous.
     
  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    yes -that also got a mention about a month ago on this thread. I am in regular email to him on these ideas. The killer for that idea is how to motorize the wheels, and do it with a flexible transmission - driven from a motor in the main hull.
    Those mobile ladder platforms used in building contruction have steerable hydraulic motors, but they are not marinised and would probably be a mess in a short time. The size of the deisal engine used to power those ladder/platform machines is way to big for a small yacht.
    If someone knows whereto get marine quality hydraulic wheel hubs - I would be over the moon. I have even checked those track add ons you can get for 4wd vehicles, but they arnt recomended for salt water. Getting power to them would have to be with axles as well.
     
  7. Kay9
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    Kay9 1600T Master

    Why not use diesel electric....Give each wheel a small electric motor as well as the prop?

    K9
     
  8. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Same problem - any suitable marinised electric wheels out there ?

    I sent an inquiry re deisal electric to OSSA Powerlite products some months ago, but they 'iced' me and didnt bother replying to my email after I explained the plan, and filled out their 3 page questionaiare. They probably dont work for under quarter of a mill!
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2008
  9. captaintrue
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    captaintrue Junior Member

  10. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Great product that sea-quad! Thats the sort of innovation we need in this boat world. Thanks for the link captain
     
  11. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    Here's an option..has a 45-knot open-sea capapability in catamaran mode and deployable/retractable skirt system for amphib mode. Bit pricey..only for the most descriminating yacht owner with very, very deep pockets. :D We are on the design team for this thing...pic shows it in amphib mode and I'm not sure I can show it with skirt system stowed...without permission from the project office.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

    I'm working on a design/model with a retractable skirt for heavy weather, but it's just a hobby.

    Have you seen the inflatable attachment to the CB90? I'm assuming it's to extend it's rough seas capabilities with extra buoyancy.

    http://www.navytimes.com/news/2007/06/navy_riverineboats_070616/
    [​IMG]

    EDIT: Can you post anything on the 57 foot RC SES model yet?
     
  13. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    That pic of the Dockstavarvet design looks like it was taken at the floating causeway at the MACC exhibition at Little Crekk..been there with our own craft.:D

    Should have some good pics to post of the 57' SES model soon..hulls are about complete and outfitting begins soon.
     
  14. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect


  15. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

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