Sea sickness

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Manie B, May 4, 2008.

  1. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Cape Town South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

    I as yet have never had it bad - but then i have never been out for more than three days in good weather, 32 ft mono, when does it hit somebody like me, small boat? the unussual motion of a cat? stormy weather? i have even heard of folks getting sick when becalmed = hot - no wind - big swells.

    What fixed you? could you still think clearly?
     
  2. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    There was quite extensive discussion on boat motion likely to induce sea-sickness here somewhere (sorry for such a useless answer - all I can hope is that someone will see and post a link...:D:D:D:D

    Face forward (or the direction where there appears least motion) bend ze knees, to keep the torso vertical and "least moved", breathe deeply fresh (not engine fume) air, eat well and sensibly...??????????????????????
     
  3. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    the1much hippie dreams

    my dad (fisherman all his life) would get sick if moored for over an hour,,,man we would row out to the boat,,and NO SCREWING AROUND! lets get unda wayah!! hehe ;)
     
  4. Kaptin-Jer
    Joined: Mar 2004
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    Location: South Florida

    Kaptin-Jer Semi-Pro

    Good thread to get started.
    My wife got so seasick she actually passed out. This was on a 20' walk around in Key West on a relatively calm day 15 years ago. Now I can't get her to go out on our own boat, a 38' Beneteau, unless it is to cruise up the intercoastal to the first dockside restaurant. We both need help. Something to cure her so I get my mate back. I really don't like sailing alone.
     
  5. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    The best cure ever for seasickness is "Cling to a gum tree"

    Now if you are still silly enough to want to go out on the water, then the best pills i ever used were for morning sickness for women, I forget the name, someone will tell us now, but they certainly worked.

    masalai, is right too, try to look toward the horizon, face forward, plenty of fresh air, make some other poor bugger do all the navigation and engine repairs, and try sipping Coke from a glass bottle, it supplies good sugar for energy and bubbles to help the stomach cope with the washing machine effect.

    It usually goes after three days anyhow manie, so you must have been soooo slose to not feeling crook anyhow.
     
  6. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    that standing up front and looking works,,,,ask our dear 1st president,,,him crossing the Delaware river,,,everyone thinks he's standing being all cool,,,NOPE,,,was cause he had sea sickness hehe TRUE! hehe ;)
     
  7. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    Having served on a couple of Coast Guard ships that tend to go out in the most horrible weather you can imagine, I learned very quickly that there are some people who are not affected by motion sickness, and then there are those who can get sick on an aircraft carrier tied to the dock. Most of the rest of us are in between. Normal conditons may cause is to feel a bit queasy but that's about it and you get used to the motion and it goes away. Then when you get into a real blow is when you find out whether or not you are one of those that get really sick. But with most people it happens once, and then you will probably never have it happen again because your body adapts to it.

    Just pray and hope that you aren't one of those with chronic motion sickness. That is an actual medical term. I have known a couple of people like that. They were always sick under all conditions. And most medications didn't do much for them.

    There are some pretty good meds available. The transdermal patch is probably best. You just stick on your neck under your ear a day or so before you get underway. Then there are a raft of pills you can take. Talk to your pharmicist
     
  8. Meanz Beanz
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    Time & barely. If you get it properly you are a liability, first do no harm... most drugs make you a liability as well IMO. British Navy had one that worked well, forget the name, mother dearest (was chronic) used to get it sent from UK, can't get it in Oz. Mostly I am OK... I had a certain place that I could take anyone to on the right day and if you didn't chuck you where bullet proof. IMO anyone is susceptible in the right conditions, even the super folk that "never get it".
     
  9. Guest625101138

    Guest625101138 Previous Member

    I can turn most people reasonably quickly by eating the bait. The black ink from smelly squid turns most off when it is running out of your mouth or you chomp on a handful of sunbaked white-bait. I prefer the white-bait to the squid.

    I used to get sick as a teenager on the first fishing trip after a long break and it was always bending down over the bait bucket but managed to get less affected as I got older. The only time I have been delicate as an adult was on a 50kt passenger liner. I had to get towards the bow and watch it drive into the sea to feel comfortable as we turned north off Sydney heads. The spew in the lift on the way to the deck set me off.

    My brother was chronic but my father would never leave a good fishing spot just because someone was seasick. After an hour or so of gut wrenching dry reaching my dad would tell my brother to let him know when he had the furry bit in his mouth - then we would go home. He got so used to being sick that he could vomite while reeling in fish. He overcame it as he got older and bought his own boat.

    I recently saw this little comment about seasickness:
    First you think you are going to die
    Then you wish your were dead
    So it can be a serious health issue.

    I think being in control helps. If you concentrate on guiding the vessel over the waves I believe you are much less likely to get sick. This is much easier than being stopped and putting head down to bait a line. A moderate displacement yacht under sail is a very kind motion in my view. Not having bait and fish gut about helps as well.

    I have heard ginger has been proven effective:
    http://www.scuba-doc.com/moresea.htm
    I think mythbusters got positive results with ginger.

    Rick W
     
  10. Meanz Beanz
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    Eating bait ! yech! Jeeze I only sailed past the Sydney ocean outfall off North Head in a big greasy swell with stuff all wind. That'd work for most, can't do it anymore, it's gone.

    Big boats are worse IMO, never been off when the spray is flying.

    Your brother sounds like he deserves a medal :D
     
  11. the1much
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    the1much hippie dreams

    we used ta eat raw scallops right outta the shell,,,get it between ya cheeck and teeth,,,and it start "jumping" and squiggling,,,get the tourist sick right there on the dock hehe ;)
     
  12. Meanz Beanz
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    I new there was a good reason I don't fish... U guy's... blahhhh

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    I was seasick underwater one night whilst doing a night dive with a student. I had to remove my mouthpiece, have a chuck and then wash out my mouth, insert the air and pretend nothing occurred. It was a young teenage girl that I had with me, she asked about my funny habit of feeding the fish when we reached the shore, and I had to tell her I was seasick, I have never had it again, but certainly had it that night, very strange indeed.
     
  14. Meanz Beanz
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    Thats a new one on me!
     

  15. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Cape Town South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

    Wow i find this downright scary
    didnt even know it was possible.
    I must count my blessings when i read this thread, so far when i feel "quesy" it is related to the previous evenings "discussions" over a couple of snorts!:D
     
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