Sea Ray vs Monterey comparison

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by turfmanbrad, May 31, 2015.

  1. turfmanbrad
    Joined: May 2015
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    turfmanbrad New Member

    Folks, I'm looking at 2 boats- a 1997 sea ray 240 for $11k with 670 hours, and a 1999 Monterey 262 for $15k with a new engine in 2007. I've seen 1999 240s in the 15k range as well, so those would be in the picture too.

    Basically, I don't know much about Montereys but I'm impressed with the details and amenities on the boat, but are there any underlying issues with either manufacturer for the 24-26' range between 1997 and 2002?
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    They are comparable. Monterey wasn't as big a company, but the quality is very good. 670 hours are not much if the engine was run gently. If they redline it all the time, it will have a lot of wear. You could at least run the engines and check the oil pressure after they warm up and at idle, and do a compression test.
     
  3. turfmanbrad
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    turfmanbrad New Member

    It turns out the Sea Ray only has a single prop and the Monterey has twin screws. Thats a big change for me. I'm not very familiar with Monterey Cruisers though. Where are they on the scale of Bayliner to Sea Ray? Are they up there with Rinker and Regal?

    Thanks
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Bayliner is the economy line of boats. Monterey is a much better quality and finish. Twin screws make maneuvering much easier.
     
  5. turfmanbrad
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    turfmanbrad New Member

    Good to know Monterey isn't in the "Bayliner league". I saw a Maxum and looked them up. I was surprised they were made by the same group as Bayliner.
     
  6. Skua
    Joined: Apr 2013
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    Skua Senior Member

    So is SeaRay
     
  7. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Ike Senior Member

    US Marine (Bayliner) is owned by Brunswick. They own a lot of boat companies ranging from starter boats like Bayliner to luxury Yachts such as Meridian. http://www.brunswick.com/brands/marine-boats/ They also own Mercury Marine who makes a lot of the engines in many many boat brands. In the mix is Sea Ray. In the spirit of Full disclosure, I own a Sea Ray, a 1972 18 footer made long before Brunswick bought them. But their boats are still considered one of the best on the market.

    I am familiar with Monterey they build a good quality boat. But think about this. Sea Ray has been around since 1959, Monterey since 1985. In the boat building world Sea Ray is a Lazarus. Boat companies come and go like some people change their socks. Monterey is a relative newcomer. But they have a good reputation. Sea Ray has a worldwide network. Monterey is working on it. I can still find parts and service for my 42 year old boat. Can Monterey say the same?

    Anyway. The real solution is what do you like? You need to try both. FInd some one who owns one and bum a ride. Talk to them about it. Find out the good and the bad. Every boat is a compromise. No Boat does everything well. Each has it's warts and it's good points.

    Even more important is the reputation of the dealer you bought the boat from. Ask people about them. Do they stand behind their product? both of these boats are way out of warranty so anything that goes wrong is on your dime. Do you trust the dealer with your boat?

    If you get serious about one of these boats have a certified marine surveyor go over it. It will save you money in the long run and you will need it to get insurance. Make sure they do both an in the water (take it for a run) and a out of the water survey.
     
  8. 7228sedan
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    7228sedan Senior Member

    I put over 1200 hrs on a 1999 262 Monterey in 3 years. We are based out of NJ and ran her everywhere from the outer banks up to Cape Cod & the islands. I know more or less all there is to know about that girl :). What are your concerns?
     
  9. 7228sedan
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    7228sedan Senior Member

    And likely the 262 is a Bravo3 or Volvo DP as they didn't make her in a twin engine configuration.
     

  10. Pjitty
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Pjitty Junior Member

    Searay is a good mid tier boat, so is Monterey. As far as parts go, these Planning boats use I/O configuration, whether it be Mercruiser, Volvo, or OMC[older]. You can still get parts for the vintage boats you noted almost anywhere as far as the drive train is concerned. All other parts in the boat can be had online. Longevity of a manufacturer has no bearing on quality. Your best bet is to go with the layout that works best for you and your family. Thou, I will give a nod to Searay for possibly a little better resale, due to marketing, but the vintage boats your looking at, I don't think that will make much of a difference. Good Luck with your purchase, and make sure you have it checked out and sea trialed. You don't want to get stuck with a lemon, no matter what the brand...
     
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